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n BCS Operator – Receives commands from the Watch Officer; – Responsible for the MASS command and control when operated by the BCS; – Responsible for mission planning, execution and post mission evaluation; – Could be fully or partially responsible (shared by payload operator) for launch and recovery of vehicle payloads (ROVs, AUVs, towed systems);


– Likely to communicate with other operators, e.g. crane operator, secondary operator on deck and payload operators. n Ship Crane Operator – Receives commands from the Watch Officer; – Responsible for lifting and lowering MASS to/from water; – –Will require to have communication with the MASS BCS and MASS secondary operator on deck as appropriate. n MASS Payload Operator – Receives commands from the Watch Officer; – Could receive commands directly from the MASS BCS Operator; – Responsible for operation of payload; – Could be fully or partially responsible (shared by BCS operator) for launch and recovery of vehicle payload (ROVs, AUVs, towed systems);


–Will have communication with MASS BCS Operator; – This role could be conducted by the BCS Operator.


9.6 Transfer of MASS Control


9.6.1 The person responsible for the operation of the MASS is normally the Primary BCS operator, however, in certain circumstances, this responsibility may be transferred to another person within the operation. Any hand-over of control of the MASS, whether internally or externally, should be formally planned and strict procedures developed and adhered to such that the full and itemised responsibility is always clearly allocated and promulgated both in terms of personnel and jurisdiction.


9.6.2 Control of the MASS could be transferred from the Primary BCS operator to one of the following operators:


n BCS (Secondary) Operator - Where a network of two or more BCSs are used at different locations; n Remote control using portable / hand held console - for example, during launch and recovery to/from mother ship or shore side;


n Manual operation - For optionally manned MASS, a qualified coxswain may take control of the MASS from the helm, for example, during transit, test scenarios, launch and recovery to/from mother ship or shore side;


n Fully autonomous operations – it is conceivable that in some circumstances full automated control could be given to the MASS. In this event, a BCS must be nominated as the immediate fall back if required;


n Pilotage – where port or other regulations require that a pilot is “embarked”, suitable provision must be made to allow the pilot (embarked on the MASS or using other arrangements) to discharge his duties, (including taking Legal Conduct of the navigation of the vessel within stipulated pilotage waters where applicable), with due regard to any communications latency issues.


9.6.3 It may be necessary for the BCS operator to interact with other operators and consideration should be given to the level of interaction required, methods of communication and any interdependencies. For example:


n MASS Payload Operation: – MASS payloads such as hull mounted sensors, towed sonars, may be controlled by a separate operator. This may form part of the MASS system and associated BCS or configured as a stand-alone system with its own dedicated BCS.


44 Being a Responsible Industry: An Industry Code of Practice


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