search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 32 YEARS BROWN HARES


OPENING HOURS


Monday to Friday 9.am - 5pm


Saturday 10am - 3pm


Beautiful ade to


M Measure


Built-in bedroom furniture, fitted wardrobes, sliding doors, walk in wardrobes


Our team have many years design and fitting experience, and will work closely with you to create your dream bedroom


From fitted wardrobes to built in bedroom furniture, you can have your bedroom any way you want it, in a wide range of finishes and colours.


Please call or email for a FREE home survey appointment or further information


01228 597 156 sales@southwells-bedrooms.co.uk • 93 Botchergate, Carlisle


JACK FORRESTER


I usually see hares in the evening or early in the morning. Sometimes I see a brief glimpse of a shape darting across the road, or when I’m looking into a field something pops up, like a patch of disturbed earth, to then disappear into the long grass or hedgerows. With its distinctive long ears and rapid speed, often running in a zig-zag pattern, the hare is a staple of the British countryside. It is familiar to us through some of the world of literature, from Aesop’s fable of The Hare and The Tortoise to the March Hare in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.


Like the rabbit, the hare is not a native animal. While the rabbit was brought over during the Norman Conquest, the hare arrived far earlier, coming across with European farmers in the Iron Age.


The most common is the brown hare, easy to distinguish by its black-tipped ears and white tail. Although their appearance is similar, the hare and rabbit have significantly different behaviours. First of all, hares are a lot quicker, getting up to speeds of around 50mph. To put this into context, that is about double the speed of Usain Bolt! When a rabbit is frightened, it will scurry down a burrow, whereas a hare will stay out of sight by pressing its body as close to the ground as possible, in depressions called ‘forms’.


Brown hares are at their most visible in early spring, when the breeding season


encourages fighting or 'boxing'. This is when they stand on their hind legs and fight one another, using their paws to rip out bits of fur. However, this could equally be a female batting off the advances of an unwanted male. Females can produce three to four litters of two to four young (known as leverets) a year.


Worryingly, reports in the south of England last year highlighted an increase in the number of deaths of hares, leading to speculation that Myxomatosis may now be affecting them, though no evidence has yet been published. This disease is fatal to rabbits and there is a fear in some quarters that it could ‘jump’ to non- resistant hares. Hare populations have also been affected by


the


intensification of agriculture and hunting, which has left the hare in a perilous state.


However, all is not lost: many animals such as the rabbit, otter and buzzard have been able to make significant recoveries from diseases, as well as different environmental and human pressures. Thanks to the important work


nationally by the Wildlife Trusts


being and


organisations, the various threats


facing British


wildlife are being voiced and heard.


THECOCKERMOUTHPOST Would you like to help us deliver the Cockermouth Post


door-to-door each month? If you would, we’d love to hear from you!


You can earn some pocket money or simply keep fit, so please call Helen or Mike for a chat on 01900 824655 or email info@thecockermouthpost.co.uk


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK ISSUE 431 | 23 MAY 2019 | 40


done other


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56