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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:MAY/JUNE


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Democracy is a system of decision making within an institution in which all members have an equal share of power. Interestingly, the first display of democracy within a country was in ancient India, in the city of Vaishali, where the King was chosen by people’s votes in 599 BC. The origins of democracy are usually associated with ancient Greece and Rome, their political systems being the foundations of Western civilization today.


Some may hold the term ‘School Council’ in the same light as a group of politicians who are, as the famous phrase goes, ‘all talk and no action’. It is fair to say that in some cases there is a stigma surrounding student bodies that nothing much gets done. Nothing much gets changed. Here, we are smashing the stereotypes and proving that


these


preconceptions are wrong. How? Not only has a Student Council been set up, consisting of two pupils per form group in every year, on top of that there are two Super Councillors per year group who attend regular meetings with the most senior members of the school, including the Headmaster.


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


NEWS


Ambulance. On top of that we have many projects underway, everything from schemes to reduce the school’s plastic waste to the promotion of more mental health awareness and support within our own school community.


By Catherine Spedding, School Super Councillor and Deputy Head Girl and Benjamin Guest, Deputy Head boy


Already this term, the School Council team has made a difference. On the 31st October, on request from fellow students, the School Council organised and ran a Halloween Fundraiser, including not only the first ever Pumpkin Carving Competition, but also a Halloween themed bake sale. The result of this was over £90 donated to St John’s


At Keswick School, this fair and just system of democracy is inbuilt to our very foundations: hence the importance of the role of the school council. The most important factor for us is that the whole school is involved in the decisions and changes in school. No one person should feel voiceless. This is why we pride ourselves on making sure that every pupil knows exactly what takes place and is discussed in each School Council meeting: the minutes of which are distributed into every form tray. Before making an agenda, we make sure that every form has had a chance to look at the order of business and add anything they wish to be discussed.


We feel that a School Council system is an integral part of the running and success of student life, to make sure that we thrive as one community.


ISSUE 431 | 23 MAY 2019 | 21


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