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EUROPEAN MARKET RESEARCH


The UK’s David Lloyd Leisure ranked second in terms of revenue, and fifth in terms of membership numbers


Investor interest The fact that the top 10 operators now account for revenues of more than €2.8bn and appear to be on track to reach the mark of €3bn within the next two or three years is also driven by the increasing interest of investors in the fitness industry, as eight of the top 10 operators were involved in merger and acquisition (M&A) activities in 2014. A total of 19 M&A transactions were registered in 2014,


more than doubling the previous year’s total of nine deals. Of the 19 deals, 10 were conducted by financial investors. “The large number of M&A transactions in 2014 is a strong


indicator that the financial world sees the health and fitness market as an attractive sector in which to invest,” says Hollasch. “These investors will help the industry to continue its current growth, assist established operators in expanding their business, and support start-ups in entering the market with innovative concepts and offerings.”


Significant potential Despite the strong growth rate in 2014, plenty of future potential remains throughout all European health and fitness markets. In the two largest national markets – Germany (9.1 million members) and the UK (8.3 million members) – budget clubs and highly specialised operators are driving an expansion of the fitness market. Yet these markets still have relatively low penetration rates. Most notably, less developed markets such as Turkey and


Russia still display considerable market potential. There are around 47,000 inhabitants for every one club in these markets, with penetration rates of 2.3 per cent and 1.9 per cent respectively. By contrast, Norway is the most mature market with a ratio of 5,192 inhabitants per club and a penetration rate of 19.6 per cent. Looking forward, the health and fitness market will be


shaped by macro-societal drivers such as increasing obesity, ageing populations and a growing middle class, as well as recent technological advances such as mobile applications, networked equipment, wearables and cashless payments. With major


operators and suppliers already reacting to these trends, it’s hopeful that they will be able to use them to their advantage. “Last year, we announced ‘80 million members of health


and fitness clubs in the European region by 2025’ as our industry goal,” concludes Herman Rutgers, board member at EuropeActive. “With the growth in 2014, we’re well on our way to reaching that goal. It shows the increased consumer enthusiasm for our industry’s products and services.” ●


SOARING SUPPLIERS


2014 was a year of strong growth for equipment manufacturers, with the estimated global market size increasing by 10 per cent to €5.5bn. After notable falls in revenue in 2008 and 2009, due to the global economic situation, most manufacturers have recovered and partly exceeded their pre-crisis sales levels. The eight leading manufacturers analysed in the European


Health & Fitness Market Report 2015 – which account for 40 per cent of the total market – achieved a growth rate of 10.6 per cent globally in 2014. US-based Life Fitness remained the largest fitness manufacturer with global net sales of €562m, followed by Italian company Technogym (€465m) and Johnson Health Tech (€411m).


READ ALL 145 PAGES… A hard copy of the European Health & Fitness Market Report 2015 can be purchased via the EuropeActive website – visit www.health-club. co.uk/europe2015 The report costs €95 for


EuropeActive members, or €195 for non-members, plus delivery.


76 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital July 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


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