This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Read the full series at www.healthclubmanagement.co.uk/retention


‘Brand fans’ will share their experiences of your club online


Human interaction still has a far greater impact on retention than technology; use technology to empower staff


Indeed, the Next Generation 3.0


retention approach is a member experience method that involves stored member data, the CRM system and your staff – and it’s built to provide personalised club experiences via a multitude of devices. This approach is the foundation of Ken Blanchard’s book Raving Fans: A Revolutionary Approach to Customer Service. Going forward, the ability (or


inability) to compete in the fi tness market will therefore be based on operators maximising technology to provide insights and data that will enable their staff to enhance and personalise the member experience. Customer-centricity will be key


– trying to serve customers with systems that are built for mass deployment of a single member experience simply won’t work. The sheer pace of change in technology, and the options this provides to the consumer, means we have to explore new ways to provide member services and reassess the role of traditional models.


July 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


Personalising the experience With the proliferation of communication channels meaning members can now choose their preferred method(s) of interaction, the need to build a unified customer service approach – with integrated services that are seamless in their availability and proactive in their approach – is increasingly important. This is already being delivered in the boutique health and fitness club market, where personalised messaging or invitations for opportunities, such as one-off special guest classes, are relevant and delivered on time. Equipment manufacturers are


also working hard to integrate new technologies that provide more information about the individual member and, as such, enable club operators to push targeted information to the member. However, despite these opportunities,


many operators are struggling to develop a strategy that supports the individualisation of the experience. This is because they still use member


service models built for the masses, and continue to reduce member-facing staff to such a low level that customer service is ad hoc and varying in quality.


Building brand fans But where service is done well, health club members are changing their behaviours and becoming ‘brand fans’ that engage with the brand as a way to build their own image – particularly true of those customers using boutique and specialist facilities. And as members evolve, so must


organisations. With many health club operations offering similar products and services, there’s a growing requirement to design unique member benefi ts to set your club apart – and service is becoming the primary differentiator in this competitive market. Companies will need to grow more


intimate relationships by leveraging their business analytics, CRM systems and social media platforms to understand member behaviour and requirements and anticipate their needs.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 67


ALL PHOTOS: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


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