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HEART RATE TRAINING


TAKE IT UP A BEAT


What’s the future of heart rate training, and how do we embrace it?


H


eart rate training first hit the headlines in 1976, when the Finnish cross country ski team swept the board at the Winter


Olympics after training this way. From then on it became popular among elite athletes, but cumbersome chest straps and baffling information made the uptake slow among the general public. However, the conversation is certainly in full swing


now thanks to operators like Orangetheory Fitness, which has put heart rate training at the centre of its offering. With growing awareness and fast evolving technology, where is heart rate training heading?


Gyms must offer advice based on data from


people’s devices


Liz Dickinson


Mio Fuse: CEO Heart rate training is set to become far more pervasive. Since the introduction of the wristband, apps are springing up teaching people how to understand heart rate training and group classes are using it, with heart rates displayed on a big screen. The technology is still fairly large and limited in terms of the activities it can measure, but in the not too distant future it will become smaller, with metrics to help with training optimisation, including oxygenation, respiration and hydration. Hydration is important. Most people are dehydrated


but don’t realise it – it can make them think they’re hungry. Oxygenation and respiration are metrics more relevant for the upper echelons: oxygenation measures the effi ciency of your cardiovascular system, making sure you’re optimising exercise in such a way that you’re getting enough oxygen to feed your muscles.


We’re currently working with major clothing


companies with a view to integrating the technology into clothes, so soon the monitoring of our vital statistics will become just another thing we take for granted. As heart rate technology becomes more


widespread, and in multiple forms, clubs need to be ready to take the data that streams from


those devices and offer guidance and training advice. They could also change their programming so it’s more centred around heart rate. It will make a dramatic impact, because people will start to train effi ciently instead of spending hours at the gym without seeing any benefi t. They’ll see weight loss and increases in CV strength, which helps in all areas. It will really change the ability of the average person to get in shape. The growth in this technology will lead to more apps


and websites being developed to deliver coaching, so gyms would be well advised to create an app for themselves.


54 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital July 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


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