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Key st a t i s t ic s


• 87 per cent of UK companies cite leadership as one of their


• Only 6 per cent of UK respondents say they have


biggest challenges


• Half of UK organisations say their succession plans are not


• Less than 20 per cent of UK organisations believe they can


clear and current


• Over 70 per cent of participants rated learning as an “important”


clearly defi ne their culture, and communicate and measure it


• Six out of 10 UK HR leaders reported that their need for


or “very important” problem


contingent workers, such as freelance and part-time staff, will continue to grow over the next three to fi ve years


Talented self-employed contractors are fundamental to the growth and success of the fitness sector, as well as other industries The lack of investment in learning


their talent programmes, processes, strategies and analytical tools will translate across a diverse employment base. The model requires unifi ed management and risk controls across the contingent and traditional employee bases. Companies who don’t do this risk alienating this vital talent pool.


Learning and development The employment experience is impacting learning and development, which has become a more serious talent challenge for UK organisations. The issue has grown from the 11th most important in 2014 to become the fourth biggest challenge this year. Indeed, over seven in 10 survey participants rated learning as a


“very important” or “important” problem. Learning capabilities also dropped significantly, as the ‘capability gap’ – the difference between the survey’s importance index and readiness index – has nearly doubled in the past year, from 12 to 20.


July 2015 © Cybertrek 2015 Executives should see HR as a key


during the period of austerity has greatly impacted health and fi tness providers, who, as discussed, are facing issues in leadership, trying to manage high levels of contingent workers, and yet still need to engage with their diverse employee base. In order to help workers mature skills that are not only important to the business’ success, but that also develop meaningful careers that engage and retain talent, close attention to learning and development is essential.


Driving change In all, 87 per cent of organisations are planning to transform their HR functions in the next three years – yet fewer than one in 10 business leaders believe HR has the capability to transform itself. To the business, HR’s administrative function is just table stakes. It’s actually about how HR drives value to the business that really count – how its interventions enable greater efficiency.


player in the development of business strategy. HR and its leaders need to be bold, agile, business-integrated, data- driven and deeply skilled in attracting, retaining and developing talent. This can all happen, but only with a


proactive makeover. The health and fi tness industry holds one of the most diverse employee bases in the UK, and the HR function in these organisations must adapt to help their businesses thrive in the new world of work. ●


ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Mark Bowden is a director in Deloitte UK’s human capital practice. mbowden@deloitte.co.uk +44 (0)20 7007 5592 @MarkMbowden


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 73


“excellent” programmes in place to develop Millennials


PHOTO: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/ SYDA PRODUCTIONS


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