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MANAGEMENT SERIES


Follow the leader?


86 per cent of UK organisations face leadership issues, according to new research from Deloitte. Mark Bowden reports


I


t’s very clear that leadership is becoming a perennial issue for British companies, yet few feel they’re making progress in addressing it.


According to Deloitte’s UK 2015


Human Capital Trends survey, almost nine in 10 cite leadership as one of their biggest challenges. This makes it the most pressing concern for companies for the third year running. Half of UK organisations say their


succession plans are not clear and current, yet only eight per cent believe their leadership pipeline is “excellent” to address the problem. The issue among Millennial leaders (people born after 1982) is particularly prevalent, as only six per cent declare they have


“excellent” programmes in place for their professional development.


Ab o ut t he s ur v e y M


ore than 3,300 business and HR leaders participated in Deloitte’s


2015 Global Human Capital survey. They represent businesses of varying sizes across a range of industries in over 100 countries. This special excerpt, the UK


Human Capital Trends report, is based on results from 72 UK respondents and summarises the trends and priorities of HR and business leaders. This report is designed to complement the Deloitte 2015 Global Human Capital Trends report, available at www.deloitte.com/hctrends2015


Millennials will become ever more important in the UK workforce This in spite of the fact that, by 2025,


Millennials will represent 75 per cent of the workforce. Combined with the fact that four million Baby Boomers are retiring each year, it’s clear that Millennials will become ever more important to the workforce, shaping the talent and leadership agenda. This issue is particularly key to the


health and fi tness industry, which has a generally younger workforce than many other industries. These organisations must ensure they invest in this generation’s development or risk the future leadership of the industry.


Lack of engagement An organisation’s culture – defined as employee engagement, meaningful work, strong leadership importance, and job and organisational fit – has risen as a key issue for companies worldwide. The talent themselves, particularly Millennials, are helping drive this change. Indeed, in another recent Deloitte survey, 78 per cent of Millennials cited working for an innovative organisation as a reason for selecting an employer. But in the UK alone, fewer than 20


per cent of organisations surveyed for this year’s Human Capital Trends believe they can clearly defi ne their culture, and communicate and measure it. As a result, eight out of 10 respondents said they had a lack of employee engagement.


72 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital Outdated processes such as annual


performance reviews and unnecessarily complicated work environments are factors that are likely to be driving this disengagement. Companies need to look at their ‘offer’ to employees, and ensure it’s updated to refl ect the employment experience that the workforce demands. In areas such as talent acquisition and retention, businesses must revamp their approach to secure and maintain an engaged workforce.


The wider talent pool There’s little doubt that contingent workers, such as the self-employed and contractors, are of fundamental importance to the health and fitness industry. Allowing companies to have fast access to a network of seasoned professionals such as personal trainers or fitness instructors, the use of


‘on-demand’ talent is also now growing in popularity throughout the rest of the UK’s workforce. Across all sectors, six out of 10 companies reported that their need for such workers will continue to grow over the next three to fi ve years. This is almost 10 per cent higher than the global average. As many of these contingent workers


are not currently integrated into companies’ HR systems, if they want to engage and retain these professionals, organisations must think about how


July 2015 © Cybertrek 2015


PHOTO: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/ PRESSMASTER


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