This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Shamanism + Yoga: Break On Through To The Other Side – Part I


ORIGIN COLUMNIST | Ashley Turner


An intricate tapestry of tools and traditions weave into my personal practice, study and work—but none has contributed more to my healing and awakening than Shamanism, astutely combined with yoga and meditation.


The archetypes of the Shaman and Priestess have long fascinated me as doorways to download our mystical powers, unconditional love, and understanding on this physical plane. The function of both the Shaman/ess and Priest/ess is the same: to be a direct translator of the Divine, to decipher symbol, Spirit and Psyche to the layman and act as a mirror—reflecting one’s Divine light and absolute perfection.


MAGIC


The word “magic” seemed fantastical and wholly unattainable until I visited Peru and met my Shaman.


The entire culture, land, and people of Peru and the Sacred Valley radiate a sublime joy and luminosity. The rich history of the Incas is founded in deep, numinous, pagan traditions—celebrating and sourcing the power of the elemental forces, medicine songs, animal spirits, medicinal plants, apus (mountains), rivers, the celestial realm and mythic creatures who lie in wait to help us along our human path.


The Shaman/ess heals by entering and holding a “non-ordinary,” diffused state of awareness. Read: spiritual, mystical or archetypal state of mind. He/she assists the community by accompanying them into and through the underworld, or Shadow, unseen aspects of Self to retrieve those parts of ourselves that we have filed away, repressed, forgotten or shut down. No doubt, this is a scary and overwhelming endeavor. Enter the tools and heart of the Shaman.


Magic = making the invisible visible.


The primary function of the Shaman is to illumine the invisible— making it visible, available to be honored, felt and healed.


SOUL DIVING: penetrating the imaginal realm


Traditions of shamanism vary greatly, but all hold the chief tenet to assist the laymen in seeing, feeling, and healing what they ordinarily cannot – diving into the depths of their soul – the unconscious.


Shamans enter a trancelike state (similar to the Priestess trance induced by the spinning wheel) via breathwork, medicine songs (Icaros), ritual ceremonies with plant medicines, sweat lodges, traditional instruments to summon spirit guides and power animals (drum, rattles, gong, shake, feathers), vision quests and rites of passage.


From a Jungian or Depth Psychological perspective, the Shaman is penetrating the imaginal realm—the realm of consciousness translated through symbol, sound, myth, sensation—beyond logic, linguistic or linear understanding. The yogic path corresponds in uniting the individual with the infinite and retrieving the power of our unconscious (depth) mind through sound (mantra, nada yoga), sensation (tantra), song (bhakti), image (yantra), myth and breath.


THE THIRD EYE: unlocking the gateway of perception


The imaginal realm represents the opening of the third eye. The aim of shamanism is to roll away the stone, open the gateway of the Ajna Chakra (third eye) to see through the lens of the unified field of Spirit (instead of the right/wrong perception of the right/left eye).


In the words of Carlos Castaneda, famed Peruvian anthropologist and author: “The third point of reference is freedom of perception; it is intent; it is spirit; the somersault of thought into the miraculous; the act of reaching beyond our boundaries and touching the inconceivable.”


The ritual ceremonies, icaros (medicine songs) plant medicines and vision quests of Peruvian Shamanism correspond directly to Jnana Yoga (study of wisdom), Yantra Yoga (vision, image), and Bhakti Yoga (devotion, chanting). Through this comprehensive braid, I have cleared and healed ancestral wounds, seen the invisible, and viscerally come to know the light within.


To be continued. Look for Part II in our next issue…


Join Ashley on her PERU SHAMANIC YOGA PILGRIMAGE, March 16-25, 2012. Celebrate Spring Equinox 2012 with Shamanic Yoga rituals atop Machu Picchu. Visit www.TheTravelYogi.com/adventures/peru for details.


Ashley Turner, MA, MFTI, elevates personal growth as a lifestyle, as a yoga instructor, psychotherapist, author and ordained Priestess. She lives in Santa Monica, CA and Aspen, CO and works with therapy clients worldwide via Skype. www.AshleyTurner.org


OriginMagazine.com | 71


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164