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Creating Connections: Aligning Body, Mind, Heart and Art


Elizabeth Reese, Ph.D. H


umans created museums and galleries as places to experience art. However, in a context seemingly disconnected with everyday realities, museum professionals spend hours, if not careers, luring people away from their day-to-day responsibilities and into places that sometimes seem as surreal as a Salvador Dali landscape.


“What do art and museums have to do with me and my life?” many gallery visitors ask themselves.


“If you’ve been paying attention to art museum education in the past two decades, you know how much has changed. Gone are the sleepy galleries, dark after 5, the tour guides who are ‘walking and talking,’ and the inescapable hush of a silent space. To be sustainable, museums have had to repurpose, redefine, validate, and reinvent,” says Amy Lewis Hofland, director of the Crow Collection of Asian Art.


Toward that end, the Crow Collection has partnered with my own catalyst-for-creating-connections, Yogiños: Yoga for Youth®. Together we weave wellness, yoga, and original works of art within the museum space to construct meaningful experiences where people spanning numerous centuries and continents can connect and align body, mind, heart and art.


We offer weekly classes for families and youth using art from Southeast Asia as a point of departure to teach flexibility, strength, balance, collaboration, civic and social responsibility, mindfulness, and nutrition. When exploring, reflecting and responding to stories about Vishnu, for example, we discuss ways he helped the earth and share how we can do the same.


When investigating vahanas (or vehicles) and companions, we explore a sculpture of Parvati and then perform the pose representing her companion, lion/león/simhasana. We practice relieving stress and controlling our “roar” on the mat so we are better able to responsibly respond than irrationally react off the mat. These learning initiatives also are available in guided tours for school groups.


Join us for OHMazing™ journeys as we mine connections to ourselves, others, and the world through original works of art.


Elizabeth Reese, Ph.D., RYT, RCYT, is the founder and CEO of Yogiños: Yoga for Youth®. In addition to classes,


award-winning DVDs and Instructor Trainings are available at the Crow


Collection of Asian Art. With her Ph.D. in art museum education, Beth is a yoga practitioner for over 10 years and the mother of three OHMazing™ yogis under the age of 12.


WWW.YOGINOS.COM


Breakfast Yoga Club Melissa Smith


expanded to Austin and now Houston. Our mission is to unite the yoga community by offering yoga classes for free/donations, with featured yoga studios/venues and yoga teachers. Each month we will feature a local charity to build awareness and community support for organizations in our area. The Breakfast Yoga Club is not affiliated with any particular studio, but works with different studios in a neutral location to fulfill its mission.


T


At our October BYC, the Katy yoga community came together in full force with teachers from the local Y, Yoga West, Yoga on the Brazos, 24 hour fitness, and Art Montage Yoga studio. The yoga studios cancelled their own Saturday classes and encouraged their students to come out to the event. With over 150 attendees, we are growing.


The BYC is yoga without boundaries.


DECEMBER BYC: Sunday, 19th, at Lululemon The Woodlands with Cherry Blossom Yoga, The Woodlands Anusara Studio, and more.


If you would like to participate, donate or sponsor an event, please connect with us through:


www.BREAKFASTYOGACLUBHOUSTON.com. OriginMagazine.com | 89


he Breakfast Yoga Club is a yoga social for the yoga community of Houston, Texas. The concept started in the Dallas/Fort Worth area with Ricky Tran and has


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