This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
“All my life I’ve been waiting for I’ve been praying for For the people to say That we don’t wanna fight no more There’ll be no more wars And our children will play One Day, One Day, One Day”


-One Day by Matisyahu W


hat happens to someone who has survived civil war or genocide? Seen their loved ones


brutally murdered? Been abducted and abused by rebel armies? Forced into slavery? Violent acts are devastating to the survivor. People who experience violence are likely to repeat it, causing a vicious cycle. How can the cycle be broken and the violence stopped? If we could, we would affect not only individuals, families, and communities — but entire lineages.


Strongheart Fellowship is taking the challenge head-on with a program that offers healing and learning to young people from extremely challenging, abusive circumstances worldwide— situations such as civil wars, slavery, and child soldiering. The first of Strongheart’s global locations is in Liberia, West Africa.


Research shows that the more stressed we are from psychological or physical trauma, the more our brain state is controlled by our primitive brain areas instead of our higher executive functioning. Primitive brain regions are prone to act out irrationally in extremes of emotions, thoughts, and behaviors. Essential to ending violence in the world is teaching people how to calm themselves and balance the areas of their brain that control emotions and drive behavior.


Strongheart trains brains to move from states of


stress to inner peace. Strongheart achieves inner peace with its youth by first providing a home environ- ment where basic needs are met and safety is secured. At the core of the program is a deep sense of family, friendship, and belonging. Yoga is practiced daily to facilitate relaxation, increase focus, and build centeredness. Strongheart then strengthens core academics and helps develop career


possibilities while creating opportunities to build self-esteem through character development and respect. With this foundation in place, Strongheart’s youth are exposed to innovative ideas about how to solve humanity’s toughest problems through mentorships with a wide range of experts. This focus on creative problem-solving opens their minds to seeing what is possible in the world. But the real jewel at the heart of the Strongheart program is its emotional brain training and mindfulness practice.


Strongheart uses mindfulness practice to help its youth develop an awareness of the internal workings of their minds. This skill helps youth decrease fear and anger while increasing empathy and moral awareness. The results are remarkable. They are more compassionate and kind, better decision- makers, and less aggressive with a decrease in abusive impulses. What does this mean? It is possible to wire brains for peace. As Matisyahu poignantly expresses in “One Day,” haven’t we all been waiting for people to say they don’t want to fight anymore? Strongheart has decided—it’s time to stop waiting.


Strongheart Fellowship is at critical crossroads in its growth and development and needs to raise $25,000 by December 20th to continue its work.


STRONGHEARTFELLOWSHIP.ORG Looking for a


meaningful holiday gift?


Akawelle jewelry, a Strongheart youth project, is made from discarded Libe- rian Civil War bullets. As a two-piece pendant, the bullet bottom hangs next to a leaf shape made from the melted casings -- symbolizing that even after something terrible


happens, we can find strength to rise and begin again. The jewelry, worn by Angelina Jolie and Halle Berry, has been featured in O Magazine and CNN World. It carries a powerfully inspira- tional message inside a lovely gift- wrapped package. 100% of proceeds go to Strongheart youth.


WWW.AKAWELLE.COM OriginMagazine.com |


81


WIRED FOR PEACE


STRONGHEART uses mindfulness practice to help its youth develop an awareness of the internal workings of their minds.


By Zoe Adams, Co-Founder & Executive Director of Strongheart Fellowship


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164