This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Famine is Obscene The current drought,


ORIGIN COLUMNIST | Sheila Nix famine,


violence and


political instability in the Horn of Africa are afflicting more than 13 million people. And while the drought is an act of nature, the famine is the result of man-made factors—all of which are preventable. Abnormally high food prices, lack of governance and security in Somalia, and a historic lack of investment in long-term agricultural development in the Horn have all contributed to the severity of the current humanitarian crisis.


At ONE, an advocacy organization dedicated to fighting extreme poverty and preventable disease, we believe that droughts don’t need to result in famine. Preventative policies, like those currently in place in Ethiopia and Kenya, equip areas prone to drought with the food reserves and early-warning systems that help countries deal with the repercussions of severe weather.


More than 30,000 children have died in the past three months in the Horn of Africa. We find this statistic obscene. In fact, ONE recently released a public service announcement (PSA) called The F-Word: Famine is the Real Obscenity, to help spark greater public awareness and a sense of urgency about the ongoing famine. Working


36 | OriginMagazine.com


with a broad spectrum of leaders in entertainment, media, and politics, we hope to turn the media spotlight on the obscenity of tens of thousands of children dying of starvation in the year 2011. We must accomplish two things: continued emergency aid to those currently suffering and dying in the Horn while simultaneously building support for longer-term agricultural and political strategies that will help end the cycle of famine.


The PSA is part of a new multiyear global campaign by ONE called “Drought is Inevitable, Famine is Not” to address the famine in the Horn of Africa. We call on the G8, G20, and African governments to provide urgent emergency assistance in the Horn and to live up to commitments to


invest in agriculture made in recent years. In 2009, the G8 in L’Aquila, Italy, committed to invest $22 billion in agriculture. So far, they have only contributed one-fifth of that $22 billion, with only one year to go until the deadline.


We’re also urging African governments to step up and meet their Maputo pledge, a 2003 commitment to spend 10 percent of their national budgets on agriculture that only a handful of African countries have reached. If the pattern of hunger and famine is to be stopped, all of us together must focus on longer-term agriculture and food-security programs to boost farm productivity and better prepare farmers in poor countries to overcome shocks to their crops’ cycles.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164