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When my


insecurity gets in the way, I hear a little voice that says, “How dare you?” How dare I let my lack of self get in the way of what I know in my heart needs to be done?


We're trying to get the principles of yoga into the mainstream world, to use this voice. There are 20 million of us doing yoga!


I think we are the new mainstream and we just need to integrate. We need to take this outside, rather than just talking to the people who already agree with us.


What is it that drives you, what is at your core? Why do you wake up in the morning? What’s your fuel?


I just feel so grateful. I really just wake up everyday, I feel so grateful that I get to be here and be a part of this experience of being alive. I know it’s really hard at times, I’ve had my ass f**king handed to me, but our days are just numbered and we embody this spirit for such a short time. I just want to know that when I take that last breath that I just used the time I was given upon this planet really well. It was kind of my exchange. It’s like, “God, you gave me this gift, you let me be a part of the world for this time, here is my little contribution back.” I feel like that’s what motivates me everyday. I guess also that I’m not afraid. It’s not that I don’t get insecure and scared, but I know how to take a deep breath and try to pull that self-confidence up and out and do what needs to be done anyway, and not let that other stuff get in the way.


When my insecurity gets in the way, I hear a little voice that says, “How dare you?” How dare I let my lack of self get in the way of what I know in my heart needs to be done? It’s not about me, it’s about the collective. But I have to deal with that other part of me that gets weird.


What is that part? What is that voice for you?


The voice for me is that I’m not educated enough. That’s always what it’ll come down to, “What do I know?” I barely graduated high school, I got a 760 on my f**king SAT. I’m not an academic at all. I’m passionate, I’m street smart, but I’m not an academic. When I’m asked to speak in certain environments... I’ve been asked to speak in the weirdest places: UCLA, with women bankers, about transformation. There’s a little part of me that thinks, “Oh my god! They’re going to find out that I’m really an idiot!” Then I think, “Where did that come from? I’m not an idiot.’” But nonetheless, the little voice in my head, “Someone’s going to find out that I shouldn’t be here.” That’s the little voice that can sabotage me. It never does, but I watch it, and then do what I have to do anyway. Those are my little fear points. I just feel like I’m not afraid to go up against my fear. I’m not afraid to do what needs to be done anyway. I don’t expect all people to be like that though. As my mom says, “Someone’s got to make the coffee.” Everyone’s got a role.


Yes.


They should feel really good in their role and in their purpose. Some people’s roles are seemingly much more simple and quiet; it doesn’t make them any less important in the big scheme of things. I just happen to have the personality where I can put myself out in the world. I don’t mind speaking my voice. I don’t mind getting egg on my face every once in a while. I can handle it and I know how to dust myself off and get back in there. And so, because I can do that, I feel like I should do that. I don’t expect that to be everybody’s path, but since I know it’s mine, I’ve got to put on some lipbalm, fluff up my hair, take a deep breath, and get out in the world and make a difference.


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