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Protecting & Conserving Texas’ Water Resources Executive Director, The Nature Conservancy of Texas


By Laura Huffman


LUKE’S LOCKER: Building Community for 30 Years Running


By Jayna Henstorf


Proposition 8: An Innovative Tool for Texas Landowners W


e all need water to live. During Texas’ worst single- year drought on record, it’s clear how important it is for Texas to have strategies in place that encourage


responsible water stewardship. Proposition 8, an innovative water-stewardship tool, will create incentives to encourage water conservation, protect water quality, and help keep water rates affordable.


The way it works is simple: Currently, property owners who meet a set of land and agriculture management or wildlife protection standards are eligible to have their property’s value assessed at a lower rate, which reduces their property tax bill.


Prop. 8 would extend the same tax incentives to property owners who manage their land to conserve water and protect water quality. And because the water incentives in this measure would only be eligible to property owners who already qualify for the agriculture or wildlife incentives, it would protect water quality and supplies without any reduction in tax revenues.


In short, landowners are offered a way to protect water quality and quantity without impacting the state’s finances. Recent news reports put Texas’ agricultural losses in excess of $5 billion; many lakes and rivers have gone completely dry and forecasts indicate the drought will continue in 2012.


It’s time Texans stood up for water, to protect our fragile resources for future generations. Prop. 8 was sponsored by Senators Kirk Watson, Kel Seliger, and Craig Estes, and Representative Allan Ritter, and passed unanimously by the Texas Legislature, with strong support from farmers, ranchers, landowners, taxpayers’ organizations, and conservation groups.


For more information about The Nature Conservancy or Proposition 8, visit:


www.nature.org/Texas 82 | OriginMagazine.com B


ack in the early ‘70s in Dallas, Texas, a lot of people thought that Don Lucas was kind of weird because he ran so much…much more than the runners they were used to seeing running on the track and in track programs in


schools. Neighbors would see him running on the streets after work for long periods of time. In fact, they could run errands for an hour or so and return home to discover Don still running the streets of the neighborhood. “Crazy, that guy!”


Don was part of a small group of people training for a marathon who were inspired and motivated by the successes of Frank Shorter and Bill Rogers. He was on the front edge of the running boom and was among the pioneers of running.


Running shoes as we know them today were scarce. Don was able to find two sources: Asics (then known as Onitsuka Tiger) and Nike. He began loading the trunk of his car with shoes for his running friends who were gathering at various venues to run together. The demand for these shoes continued to grow, and Don filled his garage with shoes and used the living room couch as his shoe stool. The demand continued, and Don opened a store. What better name than Luke’s Locker, and what better mission than to grow running and fitness through fantastic retail and community efforts that inspire, advance, educate and entertain? Today he has nine stores throughout the state of Texas.


Don’s wife, Sharon, and his three sons, Mike, Andy and Matt help carry the load and share the vision and the passion for Luke’s Locker. Don is still devoted to getting people “off the couch” and into an exercise mode of some sort. He is the master of training programs for all levels from walkers to elite runners.


WWW.LUKESLOCKER.COM


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