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Clearly, the current situation in the Horn of Africa—specifically Somalia—is complex. Somalia has not had a formal government for some 20 years, which has led to destructive political instability and violence. We must not allow this scenario to serve as an excuse for inaction.


We have all heard the reports of mothers, walking hundreds of miles with their children to find food, having to make the most wrenching decision possible: which child to feed and which to let die.


At the same time, in the United States, we’re watching the possible destruction of


the very programs that have helped countries absorb the shock of drought and prevent the dire conditions seen in the Horn. Congress is currently making broad decisions about programs to cut. We understand and appreciate the difficulties


they face – but if cuts to these programs come to fruition, almost a million children will be at risk of malnutrition, starvation and possibly death.


When efforts to prevent hunger, disease, and unnecessary death amount to less than 1 percent of the entire U.S. budget, cutting these life-saving programs won’t reduce the country’s deficit, but will take a real toll on the most vulnerable—which is obscene.


This past spring, I traveled to Malawi to personally learn more about practices in sustainable agriculture. We visited a joint USAID-Land O’Lakes and General Mills


Colin Farrell has added his voice to One.org’s new Hungry No More campaign, bringing attention to the famine in Africa. Colin joins other celebrities such Bono, George Clooney, Ewan McGregor, Bill Nighy and Annie Lennox.


project to increase local dairy production in the country, where we were met with more than a hundred dairy farmers. They shared their stories about how the milking cooperative has enabled them to send their kids to school, save and invest in their homes and farms, and even donate milk to a local orphanage.


Investment in agriculture helps prevent famine and malnutrition and is one of the most effective paths for individuals working their way to financial stability. This is especially true for women, who make up the majority of small-holder farmers in Africa. When women learn how to grow more food, there is a domino effect. The money earned from selling the food helps her send her kids to school, take them to the doctor when they are sick, and reinvest in her community at real benefit to the


local economy. This is no time for America to back away from proven, sustainable solutions that offer so much promise.


This is where we need you. At ONE, we’re not asking for your money. We’re asking for your voice. First, watch our PSA and share the video with your friends and family. Second, sign our petition to tell world leaders to support programs to help end the cycle of famine. Lastly, if you so desire, support short term solutions by making a donation to other organizations fighting famine on the ground in the Horn of Africa. Visit ONE.ORG/US/ACTNOW to learn more and add your voice to the fight against extreme poverty and prevent- able disease. Together, we can wipe out this obscenity.


SHEILA NIX is the U.S. Executive Director of ONE. ONE is an advocacy organization dedicated to the fight against extreme poverty and preventable disease around the world, particularly in Africa. Backed by more than 2.5 million members, we work with government leaders to support proven, cost-effective solutions to save lives and build sustainable futures.


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