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MUSIC ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO


“You just do your good work, and people care,” Alejandro says over the phone, beginning a promotional tour for his latest work, Street Songs of Love, his 10th solo album. “I always believed, when I was a kid, that if you just worked hard, you would find fulfillment. I think I got a lot of that from my father and my brothers. A working musician is all I ever wanted to be. Hard work, to stay true to what you want to do, and then eventually someone would notice for that very reason.”


It is a journey that has taken him from Texas to California to New York and back again to Texas, encompassing a breadth of music as varied as the many bands he was part of before embarking on a solo career. In the 1970s, he surfaced on San Francisco’s no-holds-barred punk scene, centered around the Mabuhay Gardens in North Beach, as a guitarist in the Nuns; Rank & File helped unite the disparate worlds of punk and country in the 1980s; and after he moved back to Austin, the True Believers combined all manner of Americana music in a harbinger of what was to come in Alejandro’s solo career, which began in 1992 with the album Gravity.


This diversity in his musical history is readily apparent onstage. He can show up with just himself and a guitar, his huge chamber rock orchestra, a lean and mean rock and roll combo, or a string quintet. Even if you’ve seen Alejandro dozens of times, you really never know what to expect. He plays every one of his songs 10 different ways, depending on the mood.


Alejandro debuted his latest album, Street Songs of Love, at the Continental Club in Austin, Texas, with his band, the Sensitive Boys. They brought two or three new songs out every week and garnered feedback from the audience before committing them to disc. The record “ended up being an album about love, the pursuit of a feeling that is forever elusive, mysterious, and addictive,” says Escovedo.


BOB SCHNEIDER


Bob Schneider is well-known for his stylistic variety, energetic live shows, and thought- provoking songwriting. “I definitely don’t limit myself,” Schneider says. “A lot of times I’ll be writing songs and pissed they’re going in the direction they’re going, but I just finish them and then write another one instead of trying to force it to become something else.”


Thanks to that approach, Schneider figures he has a library of 600-700 unrecorded songs ready at any given time. He tapped into that, as well as writing brand new material, for his latest album A Perfect Day. “I have a very active imagination and a mind that’s slowly driving me crazy,” he says with a laugh. “So there’s a lot of stuff, a lot of stories that get created in my head.”


Bob’s creative, carefree, and emotional songwriting translates to a raucous stage performance.


AKINA ADDERLY & THE VINTAGE PLAYBOYS


In jazz, the name Adderley means soul. In Austin, the name Akina Adderley means the best funk around. Carrying a family name is an untold skill that requires intelligence, ingenuity, and talent. Akina Adderley & the Vintage Playboys is an Austin soul band whose unique sound blends elements of rock, funk, and old-school R&B.


Frontwoman, vocalist, primary songwriter and bandleader Akina Adderley lights up the stage as the Little Woman with the Big Voice. Her powerful presence is irresistible, and KUT 90.5 FM declares that her “phenomenal vocals call to mind the sounds of classic soul and R&B.” Granddaughter of jazz trumpeter Nat Adderley, grandniece of jazz saxophonist “Cannonball” Adderley, and daughter of Nat Adderley, Jr. (producer/pianist/band leader for Luther Vandross), Akina brings a distinguished musical pedigree to the Vintage Playboys, who are a tight group of players from an eclectic musical background.


42 | OriginMagazine.com


“Adderley is funk to funky, with the Vintage Playboys slathering hot-buttered soul all over her arrangements” says The Austin Chronicle. This is a band daring you to dance.


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