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We were talking about the Occupy movement. It’s controversial right now and you don’t play it safe. Yesterday I heard myself say, “I don’t trust people who need me to like them and I don’t trust myself when I need you to like me.”


I love that you just said that. And it’s so brilliant because it’s something I offer in teachers training that I ask myself all the time. If I walk into a yoga class, when I go in to teach, in my mind before I even go in there, I have to say to myself,


“I cannot care what one person in that room thinks of me personally. I have one job to do, and that is to honor the way in which Spirit speaks through me.”


Not everyone is going to like that. But if I try to make Joe like me or Sally comfortable or Marie come back tomorrow, I’m going to micromanage every word that I say to make everyone in the room comfortable and I am no longer in truth. After class is done I have to take a deep breath, I have to be like, “Okay, someone’s going to have something not great to say about me personally.” I just can’t care. It doesn’t mean I don’t care about you as a person. I just can’t care what you think about me.


That’s not easy. That is really not easy. I’ve noticed that the second you step up and say, “I’m gonna shift, I’m going to bring people together, we’re going to change,” you hear people who don’t like your personality or say unkind things, and they don't even know you. I’m learning to have an open heart, but to have a very thick skin. I’m just wondering how you deal with that?


There’s a ton of stuff that gets written about me that’s really a lot of assumptions. A lot of it is based on [something] as simple as the way that I look, or my accent, you know?


Because my tones are really harsh. It’s regional! I’m from New Jersey!


This is the way I was raised. But I do know that there’s an edge to my voice. Even when I say, “I love you,” I say it with a lot of passion; there’s a lot of fire behind it. I


56 | OriginMagazine.com


don’t hear that, but I can see that for someone else it could get reflected in a way that seems hard. So there’s been a lot of opinions, people seem to be pretty extreme in the way that they feel about me, either they really love and care for me a lot or really don’t like me, and I have to keep fairly neutral to it, on both sides.


I appreciate people who love me and care about me, but at the same time, if I get too sucked up into that, I’m going to be looking to them for approval, for validation. I can’t do that either. I can’t do either extreme. I have to love myself.


One thing I find, when women are radically honest, unapologetic, even when it’s delivered in a compassionate way… the first thing I notice is people will sometimes go to the word, “Oh, she’s crazy.”


{Laughter] Yeah.


I feel like “crazy” is the one word that if they can label you, then anything you do is marginalized and so discredited that it’s almost ineffective. It silences you. I think it is one of the most dangerous words right now, in our society. If we can make someone “crazy,” then whatever we do to them is absolutely fine.


Yeah, they don’t matter. I was in a relationship when I was young, and there was betrayal in the relationship and I knew. I knew that this person that I was seeing was cheating on me. I didn’t have any evidence, but everything in my soul was telling me it was true. And I remember confronting him, and him looking me right in the eyes and saying, “Seane, you’re crazy,” and I thought, really? Because everything in my body just knows that this is the absolute fact and that word kept


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