This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Summer Camp


Kilian, Meador and Blanton attend Electric Cooperative


Youth Leadership Camp Kaitlyn Kilian of Medford and Michael Meador of Blackwell were selected by Kay Electric to attend the Cooperative Youth Leadership Camp near Steamboat Springs, Colo., from July 11-17. Garrison Blanton is from Ponca City. These local youth joined approximately 100 high school students from across Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wyoming to participate in the leadership camp sponsored by the electric cooperatives in each state. As part of the week-long adventure, the students established a candy cooperative business, in which they elected a general manager and board of directors, participated in daily membership meetings and paid their membership due of 50 cents to the newly established co-op business.


“The Cooperative


Youth Leadership Camp is specifically designed to empower student leaders and help them better understand the cooperative business model,” said Austin Partida, Kay Electric’s Youth Tour Coordinator. “This camp not only highlights the co-op’s commitment to their communities, but it also helps teach the students to become community leaders.”


When not tending to their candy cooperative, the students learned about electric co-ops, witnessed a high-voltage safety demonstration and built a transmission line from


4


craft supplies. They also


created multiple


committees to help plan and implement the week’s activities while improving leadership and interpersonal communication skills. The youth toured Fish Creek


Falls, Trapper Mine, Craig Power Plant and a solar array; visited Steamboat Springs; experienced the adrenaline rush of river rafting; and enjoyed traditional camp activities, such as volleyball, swimming, dancing, and competing in a talent show.


Camp participants were chosen by their local electric cooperatives through an application and essay presentation process based


lineman in their


on topic content, grammar and speech presentation.


Kaitlyn Killian, who was elected as the Youth Leadership Camp General Manager shared, “ I am so thankful that I got the opportunity to be general manager at this camp. Becoming general manger allowed me to be a part of the board. We were able to raise approximately $300 and we donated most of it to a family who had recently lost a


community.” Every year, campers elect students to return to the following year’s camp to help with coordination and facilitation of leadership activities. These ambassadors then serve as role models for the new campers. Kansas youth elected to serve as ambassadors for next year are George Ibarra, Southern Pioneer, and Liz Meyer, Flint Hills. “The speaker Richard Fagerlin was very inspirational. He inspired me to be different and to be the change,” stated Kay Electric student camp Michael Meador. Kay Electric sponsors the Leadership Camp each year as part of our strong commitment to the community and our mission to help the future generations to become leaders. Kay Electric sponsors two students for the trip. For more information about the trip and Kay Electric’s Youth Tour program call 1-800-535-1079. Kansas Electric Cooperatives first began sending Kansas youth to the camp in 1977 and continues to coordinate the camp as part of its efforts to provide educational and leadership opportunities for Kansas youth.


The Cooperative Youth Leadership Camp is coordinated by Kansas Electric Cooperatives, Inc.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136