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Candidates Face Election For CEC Trustee Cast Your Ballot at the CEC Annual Meeting on September 26


CANDIDATES FOR DISTRICT E ■ NEIL BIRCHFIELD, INCUMBENT


Neil Birchfield is administrator of Rattan Public Schools, and he has held that position since 2003. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Southeastern Oklahoma State University in 1987, and earned a Masters of Education in school administration from Southeastern Oklahoma State University the following year.


Birchfield currently serves on the CEC board of trustees. To enhance his skills as trustee and solidify his understanding of rural electric cooperatives, Birchfield recently attended the director training course, “Financial Decision Making.”


Neil and his wife, Michelle, have three children, Megan, Rachel, and Cal.


■ BILL HADDOX


Bill Haddox graduated from Southeastern Oklahoma State University with a bachelor of science degree in business education. He is also a graduate of H&R Block’s basic tax preparation school and their advanced preparation school; and Shelter Insurance Basic Underwriting and Marketing School and their Advanced School.


In 1964, Haddox entered the ministry and has pastored mostly rural churches throughout southeast Oklahoma. He spent a short time in California while serving as an evangelist during his early years in the ministry.


Bill Haddox ■ BECKY FRANKS Neil Birchfield


Becky Franks attended Antlers High School and graduated from Southeastern State University with a BA in education in 1989. While working as an elementary teacher at Goodland, she witnessed the struggles of visually impaired children at the school, along with her own father going blind. Using skills she learned as an intern at the School for the Blind in Muskogee,Franks wrote and received a federal grant allowing 28 school districts in southeast Oklahoma to provide services for visually impaired children. When other school districts needed help with services for blind children, she helped form several co-ops that enabled others to access these services. She


Becky Franks


continues her work with visually impaired children to this day.


In 2000, she and her husband, Guy, started Rebel Hills Guest Ranch east of Antlers. Under her management, Rebel Hills Ranch has grown to over 600 acres, eight fully furnished cabins, a covered guest pavilion and 10 rental properties. The ranch includes a five-acre lake stocked with fish, exotic animals including llamas, zebras, camels, elk, longhorns, lemurs and a variety of winged birds. The ranch attracts over 6,000 annual tourists to the area, where they spend money with local businesses and contribute thousands in tax dollars to Pushmataha county and surrounding areas.


In 2012, Becky and Guy purchased Affordable Body Works in a foreclosure sale. Today it is a thriving business that employs several local residents.


In 2014, Franks helped organize Citizens for Honesty, Openness and Accountability. The petition drive by Choctaw Electric members gathered over 2,800 signatures.


In 1971, he opened the first H&R Block tax franchise office in Hugo. He also operates his own tax preparation business out of his home near Rattan.


Haddox further experience includes teaching high school business and coaching basketball and baseball for a short time; operating a small insurance agency for a few years; serving as a systems analyst and computer programmer for a truck line; and working as an independent contractor with FmHA doing delinquent farm analysis, chattel appraisals, and computing house payments for borrowers.


Action. Change. 75


19 40 -2 0 1 5 years 10 • CEC ANNUAL REPORT


Haddox said his interest in running for the Choctaw Electric board of trustees began six years ago when he perceived problems with the co-op. His concern is even greater today, he said, and he feels he possesses the ability to find educated, workable solutions that will help the coop to achieve the most efficient, honest and straight-forward, standard of operation possible.


CEC


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