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Northfork Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ............................. Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres .....................Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas ...........Erick Chris Mackey ....................................... Sayre Larry Smith ..................................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton ............................... Sayre Danny Davis .....................................Elk City Brendon Atkinson........................Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Kenny Waugh ................Mgr. of Marketing Lisa Dailey...................Mgr. of Office Services Jeff Mohr ................Mgr. of Acct. & Finance Kay Brown ............................Adm. Assistant Richard Bowdre ............... Operations Mgr. Heath Martin...........................Safety Director


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope ..........................655-4557


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) or


(580) 928-3366


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


DATES TO REMEMBER READINGS MUST BE IN NORTHFORK OFFICE BY THE 10th


TO BE USED FOR BILLING ADDRESS


P.O. Box 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 301 E. MAIN


OF EACH MONTH


Northfork Electric has always been dedicated to providing you with safe, re- liable and affordable utility service. The lengths we go to keep you, your family and our linemen safe are points of pride for us and are never taken lightly. From acquiring new equipment and implementing new procedures – includ- ing installation of new breaker systems that react more quickly in case of a disruption – to increasing awareness of back-up generator systems within the cooperative community and supporting the Rural Electric Safety Achievement Program (RESAP), NFEC strives to pro- mote the highest standards of safety. A lot has changed for the electric utility industry in the U.S. over the last 130 years. In the 1880s, power came to New York City through the direct cur- rent (DC) supply method. Direct current supply required generation stations to be within a mile of a consumer’s home, which was great for city residents – but not so great for those living in the sub- urbs or rural areas.


This institution is an equal oppor- tunity provider and employer.


Because of its inability to travel long distances – and the higher cost – the DC system eventually lost out to the more economical alternating current (AC) system. The AC system allowed power to travel across greater distances through the use of transformers located at power stations. These transform- ers required higher voltage to pass through stations in order to bring power to homes at the end of the wire. This increase in voltage spurred the need for increased electrical safety procedures. High voltage is considered in the U.S. to be a voltage of 1,000 volts or more. Designations of high voltage also include the possibility of causing a spark in the air or causing electric shock by proximity or contact.


Safety for ALL


By Heath Martin NFEC Safety Director


High voltage wires and equipment are a constant danger for co-op line- workers, but they can also pose a danger to cooperative members. That is why electric cooperatives are proud to be at the forefront of electrical safety equip- ment development, as well as electrical safety education.


“Our line crews participate in monthly safety meetings,” said NFEC Safety Director Heath Martin. “These courses ensure our employees are constantly reminded of the safety aspect of the job and the importance of using equipment in the safest manner pos- sible.” Lineman also attend training schools and safety conferences provided by Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives.


In addition to safety training for employees, NFEC is continuously rais- ing awareness of electrical safety in our communities by performing demonstra- tions at local schools and community events. We show members just how easy it is for an accident to occur when work- ing with electricity and how to prevent these dangerous, and sometimes deadly, mishaps. We also increase awareness of electrical safety by 12561-001 engag- ing with volunteer fire departments, emergency medical teams and sheriff’s departments on a regular basis, offering education courses and demonstrations. These programs keep service men and women, as well members of the com- munity, safe.


At NFEC we know the more people we have in our communities who are knowledgeable about electrical safety, the safer we all will be. That’s why we strive, every day, to raise awareness of, and encourage development in, electri- cal safety.


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