This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A ROOM-BY-ROOM


High-Tech Household Organization With full schedules and fast-paced lives, a variety of techno- logical tools help the Grace family, Oklahoma Electric Cooperative (OEC) members living in Norman, Okla., organize their obligations and their home. Patrick Grace is the vice president of engineering at OEC and


Kelley Grace is a CPA and a tax partner at the Eide Bailly ac- counting fi rm. In addition to work responsibilities, they have a 14-month-old son, Jennings, and are very involved in the community.


“I’m a type-A personality so being organized is a necessity for me. I don’t like the unknown,” Kelley says. When it comes to the household, the couple shares the re- sponsibilities, and they have a few routines to help them stay organized. Each night, they prepare for the next day by choosing their clothes, food, and baby supplies. On Sunday, the couple takes time to look at their schedules for the week ahead, and they make a plan for who will do what. Patrick also fi xes slow cooker meals on Sunday so they have something quick to heat up for weeknight dinners.


One of the tools they use to organize purchases for their home is the Grocery IQ app. Both Patrick and Kelley have the app downloaded on their smart phones. When they notice a need at the house, they add it to the list. The app syncs between their phones so when they go to the store, they can check items off the list. “During tax season, I work a lot. Being organized at home,


following our calendar, making lists, and getting prepared on Sunday for the week is especially important because Patrick has more childcare responsibilities,” Kelley says. Google Calendars helps them schedule care for their son and sends electronic reminders to Patrick’s mom who helps with childcare. When it comes to paying bills and managing household pa- perwork, the Graces have it all set up electronically. “We do everything online through our bank and use Quicken to reconcile our accounts,” Kelley says. “Even with deposits we are able to take a picture of the check and send it electronically so we don’t have to go to the bank.” A couple more tools that help the Graces with organizing their household are their remote garage opener and programmable thermostat. If they are in need of a home repair, they can open their door remotely from their smartphone rather than having to leave work. Patrick sets their computerized thermostat based on usage trends from OEC to maximize energy effi ciency in their home. “Being organized helps give us more structure and not be stressed out by chaos. It’s a necessity for balancing everything,” Kelley says. For families feeling the stress of their own “Grand Central Station,” let these stories serve as inspiration to organize.


Guide For more than 10 years, Michelle Lehman, owner of Organizing


Solutions “Clear the Clutter” in Tulsa, Okla., has helped Oklahoma families reduce stress through simple and practical organization solutions.


CAR AND GARAGE Before setting foot into the house, there are


several organizational tasks that can be com- pleted in the garage. First, clean out the car after every drive. Sort through mail and papers from kids’ schools and recycle or throw away unneeded items in bins in the garage. Also in the garage, Lehman groups like-items,


such as gardening equipment and car wash supplies, in trashcans. She hangs sporting equipment on hooks. Shoes also come off before entering the house. Lehman places milk


crates in the garage where kids toss their tennis shoes and fl ip-fl ops. She stores nicer shoes in their closets.


ENTRYWAY In the entryway, Lehman recommends hooks


to hang backpacks and jackets. She also has hanging clipboards for bills to be paid and other papers that require attention.


LAUNDRY ROOM For laundry, Lehman does a load every day so


it doesn’t become overwhelming. She places clean clothes in piles for her kids to put away when they go to their rooms.


KITCHEN Lehman says meal planning is important. If


there’s no plan for dinner, a family is more likely to spend money on eating out. She begins her weekly meal plan by putting together dinners with ingredients from her pantry, refrigerator and freezer. Lehman makes a grocery list based on what she needs to complete those meals. In the pantry, she groups ingredients by meal— taco ingredients, spaghetti ingredients, soups, etc.


16


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136