This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
079


enough how important it is that your client understands what lighting levels mean and what ‘character’ means,” Hughes noted. “Very early on, we went out with one of our consultants and did several nighttime walks, so that when they were talking about 10 lux or 20 lux or about character, we understood what that meant.” With this personal experience, it was pos- sible to have informed discussions about what lighting would be most appropriate for water environments, what level of lighting was required post games, and how to create a suitable balance of dark and light in dif- ferent spaces so that the site didn’t end up with a stark, brightly lit carpark feel. In due course, SVA were appointed to create detailed designs for the temporary common domain lighting during the games and for the park and public realm lighting in legacy (including a ‘transformation phase’ scheme


to allow access through the parkland while it is reformatted for use after 2014). Their involvement from the very beginning of the process, working alongside LDA Design and Hargreaves Associates, helped to form a smooth transition between each stage. Any changes to the plan during any one of the three phases could be quickly woven into plans for the other two.


Depending on location lux levels were speci- fied as 30 lux average (15 lux minimum) for highly populated concourse areas and 15 lux average (5 lux minimum) for general routes. In transformation and legacy, areas like towpaths will be given a 5 lux average (1 lux minimum).


The legacy and temporary games time light- ing columns differ to suit the requirement of each. Legacy lighting features a remov- able LED tray system for lamp changing and an optical lens array is used to layer the


With much of the world watching coverage of the games in different time zones, a cohesive nighttime design for the Olympic Park was essential. Park and Public Realm lighting offers an average of 30 lux in heavily populated areas and 15 lux for general routes. The main concourse includes seven 32 metre tall Memory Masts each topped with a wind turbine and fitted with an LED-fronted ‘halo’ that houses the floodlighting fixtures.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168