This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
044


DETAILS [lighting talk]


Each issue we speak to an architect about their relationship with light. This issue lighting artist Neil Musson talks with Stefano Manuelli of Jestico + Whiles about the importance of concept in architectural lighting.


Stefano Manuelli is an eloquent Italian with a mission; to create architecture and interiors that ooze originality, quality and innovation. Jestico + Whiles is renowned for its landmark buildings and is at the forefront of design excellence having won over 100 national and international architecture awards. I had previously heard Manuelli give an impassioned presentation about the values inherent in his design process and was curious to know whether the mindsets which I sketched in my last feature (mondo*arc 65) had a resonance in such a well established architectural practice.


My own lighting projects with MacKay Design Studio have reinforced my view that a strong concept is essential as a catalyst for originality and that over complication of a project can diminish its impact. In interviewing artists working with light I concluded that collaboration with architects from the outset is a key to effective integrated lighting and that the nocturnal experience of a space should be as rhythmic and complex as the daylight expression. Manuelli proposes that... “Successful lighting artwork should make an impact on the viewer and create an atmosphere or mood.


It should establish a connection with people and make them think. It must also move people, like a beautiful painting or great architecture, not leave them indifferent. I believe a successful design requires a strong idea or concept behind it. We always start with a narrative which is carried through the design of an object, space or building and informs its shape / materiality. Generally if the idea behind a design is good, you are half way to achieving a successful final product.”


The notion that a strong idea is half way to a successful outcome is very significant given the amount of time that architects invest in turning those ideas into reality. I asked for examples that demonstrated this strength of thought where light existed as an artistic element.


“Generally artistic lighting plays an important role in our hotel projects where we try to create something altogether memorable and unique.


“The Nautilus fish restaurant is located at water level in the marina wing of the Yas hotel, and the mood is defined by this marine setting. The entire space is lined with glowing panels of ‘ice white’ composite


that are pierced, drilled and stained with undulating, flowing aqua coloured lights to evoke the serenity of a moonlit coral reef. A stupendous chandelier makes oblique reference to the translucent, amorphous form of a jelly fish. In the Origin restaurant, we designed a feature chandelier in the private dining which is made out of over 200 small glass rods suspended from the ceiling at different heights to create a ‘landscape of light’. The sculptural chandelier is flooded with light, which is programmed to change colour according to the desired atmosphere and time of day, creating a magical effect. The inspiration was to create the shape of a melted iceberg but in reverse. “The W hotel is another great example of how artistic lighting can be an integral part of architecture. Not overlooked or lost in its neighbourhood, the hotel has a clear and distinct identity that relates to Leicester Square’s world of theatre and film. The exterior facade mimics the stage curtain and has two distinct looks. During the day the facade acts like a giant veil reflecting the surrounding environment. By night it becomes a dynamic illuminated display. Eight cameras are mounted on the roof of


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168