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OLYMPIC GAMES / OLYMPIC STADIUM, LONDON, UK


Pic: London 2012 / Dave Poultney


Above One of fourteen floodlighting sections waits to be lifted into place around the stadium. Platforms within each allow for easy maintenance, relamping and refocusing.


Pic: London 2012 / Justin Setterfield


EXTERIOR AND APPROACH LIGHTING Because of the stadium’s island location access is via a series of bridges that link to the rest of the park on all sides. The scale of lighting equipment decreases as visitors approach the stadium structure, maintain- ing a pedestrian scale and reinforcing the hierarchy of the venue when viewed from a distance. The concourse is illuminated from an array of column-mounted lighting systems, spaced on an even elliptical grid which spans the geometric form of Stadium island.


Each lighting system consists of indirect projectors that emit focused beams of light on to high efficiency reflectors. The light is asymmetrically dispersed by a deflection reflector back into the area below. Every column is a uniform, diffuse light source that minimises glare. A shield and lens system also reduces light spill from these fittings. Each concourse lighting assembly contains two pairs of luminaires, which can


be independently controlled to vary lighting levels. This not only minimises energy use but also lets the system respond to differing operational requirements.


All luminaires throughout the Stadium and adjacent areas use efficient lamps, optics and control systems to ensure that the lighting systems do not overlight or spill light beyond the areas to be illuminated. The design was developed in such a way that certain elements of the stadium could be dismantled post-games and an array of different venue configurations provided. Design options have been developed to re-use the original lighting equipment in different ways in order to provide the light- ing required.


Thanks to the close cooperation of Team Stadium – working together in the same shared office building and in a shared site compound - the venue achieved the honour of being the very first Olympic Stadium to be delivered on time and on budget.


GAME IN HAND Natural daylighting is key to the long-term use of the Copper Box.


Arup’s lighting design for the Handball Arena uses 88 bespoke light pipes to bring natural light into the building. As a result, there are 40% savings on lighting the venue. For televised events during the Games, blackout shutters built into the light pipes allow artificial light to take over and deliver the consistent lighting conditions demanded by broadcasters.


PROJECT DETAILS Pic: London 2012 / Dave Poultney / ODA


Copper Box Handball Arena, Olympic Park, London, UK Client: Olympic Delivery Authority Architect: Make Lighting Design: Arup


PROJECT DETAILS


Olympic Stadium, Olympic Park, London, UK Client: Olympic Delivery Authority Design & Build Contractor: Sir Robert McAlpine Architect: Populous (formerly HOK Sport) Engineers: Buro Happold Lighting Design: Happold Lighting


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