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TECHNOLOGY / LIGHTFAIR INTERNATIONAL, LAS VEGAS, USA


Our product reviewer David Morgan cuts through the razzmatazz to see what was on offer at this year’s Lightfair International trade show in Las Vegas.


NEVADA’S NIRVANA


LIGHTFAIR INNOVATION AWARDS WINNERS Clockwise from top left: Juno Lighting’s WarmDim LED Downlight, winner of the Technical Innovation category; Cast Lighting’s Perimeter lighting system, winner of the Most Innovative Product of the Year; Sensitine’s Fin Light Fixture, winner of the Design Excellence Award; IO Lighting’s Lili, winner of the Commercial Indoor category.


When Lightfair is held in Las Vegas, as it was this year, the show tends to have more of a fantasy element than when the exhibi- tion is held in New York or Philadelphia and 2012 was no exception. The change in tone was evident from the start, with the Lightfair Innovation Awards ceremony. Normally, the comperes are a regular crew of amiable lighting designers but this year the charismatic Hollywood virtual reality guru Paul Debevec hosted the event. We were treated to a slick presentation of his work in creating virtual digital actors with the use of his Light Stage designs that have been used to digitise real actors and create digital versions of them- selves. Clips from movies using Debevec’s technology - including Avatar and Spider- man - created an atmosphere of high tech innovation that the industry professionals in the audience were encouraged to apply to our work in the more mundane world of commercial and architectural lighting. Unsurprisingly, there was a significant dis- sonance between this mega-buck Hollywood


ideal of innovation and many of the prod- ucts shortlisted and selected as winners in the actual awards. For example, the Innovation Award was given to Cast Lighting from New Jersey for their Perimeter lighting system for chain link fences. The Cast Lighting product is an LED security mushroom light that fits onto the support poles of chain link fences and creates a light curtain for security lighting with lower energy consumption than would be used by floodlighting the whole area. Production of the nice quality sand-cast components used in all Cast Lighting products is undertaken in Columbia, South America where, appar- ently, the idea for the product arose due to the keen need for effective, low cost security lighting in that country. Moving up the innovation scale, the Design Excellence Award was won by Sensitile for their Fin Light luminaire made from their remarkable light guide material. The company produces laminated sheets of ma- chined acrylic which transmits and transfers


light to different areas of the panel in an intriguing and unexpected way. The technique is used to add a dynamic visual effect to a wide variety of architec- tural material from concrete paving slabs to the purely decorative materials used for pendants and cove lighting elements. IO Lighting, part of the Cooper Lighting Group, won the commercial interior catego- ry with their Lili indirect LED ceiling panel range. The 600 x 600 formed steel panel reflector redirects light from the die-cast heat-sink mount for the LEDs which is hung below it. The organic design of the heat sink gives a new visual treatment of the traditional office ceiling panel luminaire. Cooper Lighting also had a special presen- tation of concept luminaires using a high efficiency LED light guide material. The ma- terial and lit effect seems similar to the GE system utilising Rambus optical film which was introduced at last year’s show. Lighting Science Group won the Judges Citation Award for their retrofit LED PAR 30 lamp incorporating a motion and ambient


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