This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
074


OLYMPIC GAMES / VELODROME, LONDON, UK


The lighting has four settings to suit the level of use at any given time: Training, Elite Training, Events and Broadcast Events. In the simplest Training mode, much of the illuminating comes from the long skylights that run the length of the roof. Though less fixtures are used, their use is alternated to ensure even lamp burn times.


normally be carried out using a mobile plat- form, from which all but a few fixtures will be accessible. To help speed replacement the control gear housing and fittings have ‘plug & play’ connections for speedy isola- tion and quick release physical connections for complete removal. For final removal or replacement a lanyard system provides extra safety.


In Broadcast mode, when HDTV conditions are required, the arena track and infield lighting load is approximately 360kW. Broadcast lighting is designed to provide 2000 lux with good overall uniformity including vertical uniformity for key camera positions. The illumination level follows the requirements from the Broadcast Authori- ties for both normal HDTV and slow motion playback.


Extensive lighting simulation studies were carried out using the lighting suppliers’ soft- ware and expertise. These were checked and verified in house using a ray tracing software package.


Should the event suffer a power failure, or momentary power fluctuation (‘brown out’), the system will maintain 50% of the lighting for 15 minutes, with a further 30 minutes at 25%. This provides cyclist safety and potentially allows the current track event to be completed. At the end of the supported times, if power has not returned, lamps will be sequentially turned off with a selection maintained for three hours to aid an organised evacuation of the building. Provision is included for additional tempo- rary support of the remaining 50% during


JAPANESE Hopkins Architectsは、 Velodrom(屋内


競輪場)の内部・外部用照明デザインを担 当したBDSPと共同でこのプロジェクトに 当たりました。


BDSPはまず、 CIBSE勧告や


HDTV要件をベースに前回オリンピックの Velodromから得た経験を糧にしながらトラ ック用の照明基準を定めました。


次にトラック


用照明システムの設計と実装を担当する照 明の専門メーカーを任命し、 ード」「平常モード」 しつつ、


と 構造的な優雅さを失うことのない照


明システムの設置に取り組みました。 この照明システムでは、


事態などへの対応も図られています。 力の50%以上が維持され、 了できるようになっています。 プは、


訓練モード、


停電といった不測の 照明出


上級者訓練モード、


競技を無事に終 照明の設定タイ イベン


「オリンピックモ の両方のニーズを満た


Pic: London 2012 / ODA / David Poultney Games use.


Non televised event lighting is designed to deliver 1000 lux, again with 50% of the lighting maintained during a power failure or ‘brown out’.


Other lighting modes provide 750 lux for elite training and 300 lux for normal train- ing.


Major televised events are envisaged to take place in the Velodrome, but these are expected to represent less than 10% of the hours of operation of the venue according to their business plan. Whilst high lighting levels will be required when these events occur, for the rest of the time (90%), light- ing levels can be maintained at much lower levels. During normal day-to-day operation,


トモードおよび報道イベントモードの4形態あ ります。 るため、


屋根全体に天窓が張り巡らされてい Velodromでの活動の大半は陽光の


下で行うことができます。 報道イベントモード時には、 点灯され、


モード時には、 すべての照明が


上級者訓練モードおよびイベント 一部を消灯します。


点灯する 照明を定期的に変更することで、 CHINESE


Ho p k i n s建筑事务所与BDS P公司合 作,BDSP公司完成奥林匹克自行车馆的室 内室外照明方案。基于屋宇装备工程师 学会(CIBSE)的推荐规范、高清晰度电视 (HDTV)要求和已往奥林匹克自行车馆积累 的经验,BDSP着手导轨照明标准。之后,他 们指定一家专业照明制造商完成导轨照明 系统的设计与实施,既要满足“奥运会会


すべてのラ ンプが均等に使用されるよう配慮しています。


when only 300 lux are required for general training, daylight from the rooflights will offset much of the lighting energy required, resulting in substantial energy savings. A computer simulated daylighting study was undertaken in order to select the optimum rooflight glass type, size and location. This allows maximum use of the arena during daylight hours without using the arena and infield artificial lighting for a significant proportion of anticipated daytime use. The rooflights use diffusing glass with two PVB interlayers to prevent hard shadows that might distract cyclists on the track. When the track is used in normal ‘training mode’, a photo cell will advise the user if there is sufficient daylight available for


期”和“传统模式”的使用需要,还要很好 地与建筑融为一体。 照明方案包括停电出现的可能性。灯具要 维持至少50%的光输出— 保证任何比赛的 安全完成。打造了4个灯光设置:训练、精 英训练、赛事和电视事件。天窗贯穿整个 屋顶,保证自行车馆绝大部分比赛活动使用 自然光。电视事件模式下,开启所有照明设 备。定期变换使用照明设施以保证所有灯 具使用寿命均衡。


FRANÇAIS


Hopkins Architects a travaillé avec BDSP, qui a pris en charge l’éclairage interne et externe du Vélo- drome. BDSP a suivi les recommandations de CIBSE pour l’éclairage de la piste ainsi que les critères HDTV et l’expérience apportée par les précédents vélodromes olympiques. Ils ont ensuite nommé un spécialiste de l’éclairage chargé de la conception et


de la mise en place d’un système d’éclairage de la piste capable à la fois de respecter les exigences du temps des jeux et de garantir une fonction plus durable, tout en s’adaptant élégamment à la struc- ture. Le modèle d’éclairage choisi intègre la possibilité de pannes de courant. Les éclairages pourront alors garantir une puissance minimale de 50% - permet- tant à toute course de ne pas être interrompue. Qua- tre systèmes d’éclairage ont été créés : Entraîne- ment, Entraînement Elite, Evénement et Evénement Diffusé. Des puits de lumière ont été installés sur toute la longueur du toit, permettant l’utilisation de la lumière naturelle du jour pour la majeure partie de l’activité du vélodrome. En mode Evénement Diffusé, tous les éclairages sont actifs. En modes Entraînement Elite et Evéne- ment, certains éclairages sont éteints. L’utilisation des lampes est alors alternée de manière à assurer une durée de vie commune.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168