This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
105


The newly constructed National Stadium in Warsaw provided one of the more visually memorable settings for this summer’s Euro 2012 tournament. The 58,500-seat venue, designed by GMP Architects, was completed in November 2011, becoming the national team’s new home ground and providing the stage for the Euro 2012 opening game. Located in a parkland on the banks of the River Vistula, the stadium was built on a raised mount, giving it added prominence on the Warsaw skyline. It features a distinc- tive façade of angled mesh panels, coloured to represent the red and white of the national flag.


German-based Lichtvision Design & Engi- neering were asked to create a dynamic scheme for this façade, one that would not only underscore the two-coloured design, but also allow low-resolution imagery to scroll around the exterior.


They proposed the use of an adjustable LED luminaire with different optics and colours that could be adapted to suit the two geom- etries of the mesh panels and their respec- tive red or white (actually metallic silver) surfaces.


The 6m x 2m panels run in rows around the stadium, supported by columns set twelve metres apart. On each row, two panels fill the space between every column, angled so that they weave in and out. Each is lit by a dimmable Liner Shield AC XB 36 from Trax-


on. These were mounted behind the support columns using custom designed brackets that could be adjusted to suit the panel angle. Four different variants of the fixture were used: white LED or red LED fixtures (to suit the colour of the panel) in either a very narrow beam or medium beam version (depending on the angle of the panel). After on site testing, it was decided 5000K white LED should be used and that the ‘red’ LED fixtures should actually comprise a mix of 1/3 red and 2/3 white LED sources within them.


There are eleven rows of panels, so each column holds 22 of the linear LED fixtures, plus a further Traxon Wall Washer Shield AC XB fixture to illuminate the inside of the hallow head of each column, which is cut diagonal like the nib of a quill pen. These are all linked in a series back to one of eight e:cue Butler DMX converters integrated in four control racks. Each rack (containing two Butler converters) operates a quarter of the stadium’s façade - eigh- teen columns in each quarter - and in turn feed back to a central control room where two e:cue Lighting Control Engines (one for backup) are housed.


Control software was preprogrammed by e: cue technicians at their Paderborn head- quarters following discussions with Lichtvi- sion. It allows a number of sequences to be activated from a panel in the control room.


Traxon Linear Shield AC XB 36 are fixed to the inner edge of the façade’s angled support columns. One fixture is used to illuminate each of the mesh panels. These panels are coloured red or silver to represent the national flag.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168