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130 TECHNOLOGY / EDUCATION SHINE A LIGHT A lighting workshop has recently taken place in India to educate students and professionals alike.


The principal of CCA, Prof. Bhagat (front row 2nd from left), Dr. Dugar (front row 3rd from left) and the entire workshop team; Dr. Dugar gives a demonstration of the different types of lamps and luminaires as well as the safety measure to be taken while handling them.


Since 2010 the Research Cell of Chandigarh College of Architecture (RC-CCA), Chandigarh, India has been organising bi-annual workshops and lecture series by eminent experts in architecture or allied fields to increase research activity in architectural learning. According to the Principal of CCA, Prof. Pradeep K. Bhagat, a lighting designer himself, “These workshops are organised to provide students and educators a chance to interact with experts and get exposed to the latest trends in architecture”. Keeping this tradition alive, RC-CCA in association with Lighting Research & Design (LR&D) organised a guest lecture / workshop on the “Significance of Lighting Design” from 14th-16th March 2012 at the CCA campus. Dr. Amardeep M Dugar (Director, LR&D) was invited to conduct the workshop and lecture series. The workshop was also supported by mondo*arc and Professional Lighting Design (with copies of back issues), as well as Narinder Electricals (with luminaires for a temporary lighting installation). Day One: lectures covering design-related topics such as ‘Integration of Lighting & Architecture’, ‘Lighting Design’ and ‘Daylighting’ provided participants with a general overview on the different trends in architectural lighting design. Participants were given the exercise of redesigning their existing design studio projects with an additional component of lighting so as to apply the knowledge presented in these lectures. The three fundamental components of good quality lighting namely visual performance, visual comfort and visual ambience were used as the starting


point for the redesign of their projects. The impact of lighting on the three basic components of architecture namely form, colour and motion, were also factored in for a holistic analysis and design. Copies of mondo*arc and Professional Lighting Design were distributed among students to underline the importance of reading, understanding and applying literature available on lighting design. Days Two & Three: lectures covering research-related topics such as ‘Introduction to Lighting’ and ‘Lighting Equipment & Systems’ provided participants with a general overview on the current research and technological developments in architectural lighting design. Participants were then divided into groups and given the exercise of developing and realising lighting concepts for existing architecture. Each group was given the choice of selecting an area of architectural significance within the CCA campus. The 50-year-old campus is an example of modern architecture based on the plan, sections and elevations designed by Le Corbusier, who also designed the Chandigarh master plan. Group-1 selected the main façade and sculptures so as to provide a welcoming atmosphere for the main entrance. Halogen floodlights were used to uplight the façade niches while low-voltage halogen spotlights were used to highlight the sculptures. Group- 2 selected the boundary wall adjacent to the main entrance, play area and the surrounding landscape elements so as to give prominence to the campus at night when viewed from the outside. Metal halide floodlights were used to uplight the trees while coloured fluorescent battens and


LED festoon lamps were used to highlight the murals and rainwater canal. Group-3 selected the brick seating-wall adjoining the parking area, so as to provide a guiding line for the cars at night. LED festoon lamps were inserted inside every groove of the brick wall to highlight the textural quality of the brick and mortar. Group-4 selected the cafeteria and the outdoor seating area so as to revive the space that was dull and unwelcoming at night. Halogen spotlights were used to backlight the seating while halogen floodlights were mounted on tree branches to highlight statues and murals. The interior of the cafeteria was illuminated with blue metal halide floodlights while halogen floodlights were used to uplight the adjoining façade window-slits.


The staff and students were delighted to see the results of their work as one of the students commented, “Lighting has completely transformed the night-time image of our campus”. Prof. Bhagat and Dr. Dugar, who are both post-graduates in architectural lighting from the University of Wismar, are of the opinion that such workshops should become a part of the architecture education syllabus for budding architects and designers so they can understand the significance of lighting. The CCA management is also putting together a proposal for a lighting laboratory along with a full-fledged masters programme in architectural lighting design. Workshop co-ordinators: Prafulla T. Janbade & Anu Singh, RC– CCA Workshop electricians: Bittoo & Narinder Electricals


Workshop photographer: Rajeev Kumar, CCA


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