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031


Above left Infinity Bridge, Stockton-on-Tees, UK completed in 2010. The lighting was designed in such a way that the iconic twin arches reflect in the water at night to form the mathematical symbol for infinity (∞). Above Burj Al Arab, Dubai completed in 1999. One of the prestigious, world-renowned projects that put Speirs + Major on the map. Left Made of Light completed in 2004. In late 2002 Jonathan and Mark began developing an ambitious project designed not only to convey their passion for light, but to explain the possibilities of this elusive medium to clients, architects, designers and members of the general public. The exhibition opened at the RIBA, London, in March 2004 before travelling to the Swiss Institute of Architects conference in Berne and subsequently to The ARC Show in 2006 back in London.


“This is a deeply sad time for all of us who were touched by Jonathan. I knew Jonathan for many years and was honoured to call him both friend and colleague. His contributions to our profession were immeasurable and, indeed, lasting. Although many may only know him through his ac- complished work, much of which elevated the profile of our entire profession, his impact was even more far reaching. As a communicator, educator and ambassador, he had few peers. His infectious enthusiasm and passion for life were remarkable. A humble, yet remarkably talented man who elevated our thinking about light, and meant as much to our profession as anyone I have ever known, past or present. May his beautiful family, close friends and colleagues find peace in knowing that Jonathan lived his life to the fullest, and through his time with us made the world a better place.” Randy Burkett, RANDY BURKETT LIGHTING DESIGN, USA


“I had the pleasure of meeting Jonathan only a few times but he made a tremendous impression on me and filled me with inspiration. Jonathan and Mark are heroes to me and my heart goes out not just to his family but to his other family at S+M. As a profession we owe it to his memory to continue his work, to lead by inspiration, to find beauty in the everyday. Just like he did.” Paul Beale, ELECTROLIGHT, AUSTRALIA


“Jonathan, you were creative, imaginative, visionary and innovative. Intelligent, cheerful, generous, helpful and detemined: unforgettable. Ciao.” Francesco & Serena Iannone, CONSULINE, ITALY


“Although I came across Jonathan’s name more than twenty years back our first personal encounter occurred more recently. We were finally ac- quainted ten years ago and have met each other regularly at lighting events. Due to our kinship in approach to our common subject our encounters were characterised by mutual appreciation and respect – but above all by a sense of humour and ease. I will greatly miss these occasions. We have lost a friend and a wonderful person.” Andreas Schulz, LICHT KUNST LICHT, GERMANY


“As one of the preeminent ambassadors of the lighting design profession, Jonathan spoke of light with such passion and contagious enthusiasm that it was impossible not to become captivated in his presence. His consummate ability to impart emotion in the built environment solely through the manipulation of light will remain an inspiration to lighting designers, as will his warm demeanor and willingness to share his expertise with tomorrow’s innovators. He will be missed.” Kevin Theobald, IALD PRESIDENT


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