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TECHNOLOGY / LIGHTFAIR INTERNATIONAL, PHILADELPHIA, USA TECHNOLOGY / LIGHTFAIR INTERNATIONAL, LAS VEGAS, USA


IALD BREAKS THE MOULD


A quirky but inspiring installation in The Netherlands walked away with the highest accolade at the 29th IALD International Lighting Design Awards, recognised at a presentation held during LFI.


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RADIANCE AWARD PROJECT: BROKEN LIGHT, ROTTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS LIGHTING DESIGN: DAGLICHT & VORM


Broken Light was developed in response to a design competition for Rotterdam’s Katendrecht neighbourhood. Rudolf Teunissen and Marinus van der Voorden of Daglicht & Vorm proposed an immersive experience using light as art to reflect the neighbourhood’s fiery past. “A very unconventional and original solution to an every-day situation,” one judge praised of the project. “Lighting can be fun!” Katendrecht, also known as the Cape, had been home to sailors, pirates, prostitutes and other unsavory individuals from its establishment in 1895 through to around 1980, when the last harbour activities moved on to bigger, newer harbours along the Nieuwe Waterweg. Since then, the area has completely transformed itself into an appealing residential district. Broken Light partly took over the public lighting and trans- formed the look and feel of Atjehstraat, creating an interior, cathedral-like space. Tall columns rise up along facades, reaching for the sky. Static and tight, the beams are balanced by pools of light reflecting on the ground. What looks like graffiti from above pedestrians experi- ence as pools of light and dark. The light motifs are inspired by flowers and birds, and are conveyed by the light system as high-yield light effects and patterns.


“Especially impressive are the adjustable fixtures, with moving shutters and patterns, providing individual solutions for the different lighting challenges along the street,” one judge commented. The optical system and luminaires are custom made. The vertical and horizontal projections are operated by one lamp in a fitting situated at a height of six metres. An extra standard road light armature has also been added. The designers used the system to vary the size, pattern and intensity of projections to customise space between windows, creating glare-free street lighting. One judge summed up the final design as “technically fascinating, and an equally ambitious solution to an often mundane lighting commission.” Broken Light has rejuvenated a street that until a few years ago was rife with crime. It exists as a social sculpture for the street’s residents, who literally and figuratively have welcomed a little light into the neighbourhood.


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