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MULTIMEDIA


R T


R TIME AFTER TIME A


The boundaries of multimedia applications continue to be pushed to bring experiences to life, both historical and futuristic. Kath Hudson reports on some of this year’s exciting new attractions and revamps


Visitors relive the cramped conditions of a gun turret on board HMS Belfast


E AFTAFT


have been used for this year, as operators challenge suppliers and designers to come up with ever more immersive environments.


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ALL AT SEA The conditions of fi ghting at sea have been recreated at a new immersive attraction on board the historic ship, HMS Belfast, which is docked in London, UK’s River Thames. Smoke effects, vibrating fl oors, lights and sounds are all part of the sensory experi- ence, which have been crammed into one of the original gun turrets. HMS Belfast is a branch of the Imperial


War Museum, and this project, which opened in July, is the second stage in a programme to increase interactivity and


pace exploration and experiencing history are two of the subjects mul- timedia and interactive technology


dynamic experiences on board the ship, bringing her history to life and retelling the stories of those who served on her. “Space was the major challenge with


this project,” says Shane Winterbourne, Sarner’s Head of Technical Installations. “However, recreating the cramped condi- tions of the original gun turrets was also an important aspect of it. “The story follows a young sailor on


Boxing Day 1943. As the central gun on the ship is raised for fi ring, a specially- designed moving platform shakes the fl oor as the gun shoots, recreating the force of fi ring a weapon of this scale.” Sarner worked with Casio, CUK Audio


and AVStumpfl to create the fi ve-minute experience, which has helped push visitors up over the three month summer period by almost 10 per cent, compared to 2010.


Meanwhile, across the water,


Amsterdam’s Maritime Museum, Het Scheepvaartmuseum, reopened on 1st October after a four-year redevelopment. Dutch-based 3D communication spe-


cialist Hypsos designed and built much of the new exhibition. The company has created a highly interactive experience, bringing historical events and personal sto- ries to life and presenting showpieces from the museum’s world famous collections. The infl uence of the sea on the Dutch


culture is told through 13 interactive exhib- its, including the children’s exhibit, ‘The Sea Voyage’, made by Hypsos in conjunc- tion with Tinker and MET Studio. The visitor goes on a virtual sea voyage, meeting people and stories from behind objects in the collection. Small children are catered for with Sa and Lori and Circus Sea, where children under six can ‘swim’ among fi shes in a fairy tale undersea world.


SHEDDING NEW LIGHT History is also the theme at Bristol’s new M Shed museum. The city’s story is pre- sented from prehistoric times to the present day using the recollections of people who shaped the city. The living museum chal- lenges the perceptions of what it’s been like living in Bristol over the centuries. Stories of the past spark discussions


about the future and visitors have their say via the interactives exhibits.


Visitors to M Shed contribute to the exhibits using touch-screen computers


60 Read Attractions Management online attractionsmanagement.com/digital AM 4 2011 ©cybertrek 2011


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