This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TITLE


TOP TEAM


(Top left and main picture) the Welcome Gallery and the wormhole that leads visitors into the Grainger Sky Theater; (inset) The Searchers


MARK WEBB theaters manager


What are the dimensions?


The Grainger Sky Theater is a 70ft (21m) diameter dome space. It’s 190 degrees, so a little more than a hemisphere. The fl oor is raised and there are 400 LED lights embedded in the fl oor underneath that shine up through little plastic lenses, so we can do lighting effects on the fl oor as well as on the dome as people enter. At the edge of the fl oor, between the audience area and the dome screen, there’s a 3ft (1m)-high barrier wall that acts as an artifi cial horizon and takes away some of the depth clues of how far away the screen is once the movie starts. The projection system’s single image


is created from projectors which are run- ning at 1,500 x 2,000 resolution.


How have you used light and sound?


Behind the horizon wall that goes around the perimeter there are 40 LED Philips colour burst fi xtures that are programma- ble to create a dome wash effect. We can also use the projection system to create


30


effects as people enter the theatre. A fi bre optic system goes around the base of the perimeter wall. During the course of the show it’s kept on at an extremely low level so people can see where the aisle is in the dark in case they need to leave. It’s on at full brightness when they enter and adds to the general atmosphere. A spherical space is a hard environment


to deal with acoustically. We’ve got 16 channels of audio that completely envelop the space, designed by Meyers Sound.


How does the dome screen work?


Designed and manufactured by Spitz in Pennsylvania, it’s called a nano screen. The panels of the dome screen are fi tted by hand next to each other, so under pro- jection conditions it’s absolutely seamless. There’s no interruption of the image by the screen itself, which is new for planetariums. Before, whenever you’d put a bright scene up, the seams of the dome would become immediately apparent. But with this one, they’re truly invisible. I’m just blown away by the quality of the


image we’re achieving here. It’s the fi rst time I’ve ever seen one of these systems and every time I see new material on it I’m amazed again by how spectacular it looks.


Read Attractions Management online attractionsmanagement.com/digital ALAN CASKEY


director for the Americas, Global Immersion


What work did you do?


As the technology vendor, we worked with the key stakeholders at Adler to build a consensus of what the visitor experience should be, which fi tted in with their vision, and then turned that vision into reality. We designed and installed the hard-


ware and software throughout the dome. Partners we worked with include: Rockwell Collins for the Zorro projectors; SCISS for the Uniview – science and astronomy visu- alisation software; and Spitz for the screen.


How does it work?


In the theatre, the screen orientation, pro- jector array and content combine to give the feeling of fl ying through the (digital) universe. This is achieved by combining the image output of ultra-high resolution Zorro projectors to create an astonishing 64 megapixel video display. The unique ‘hyper array’ confi guration features custom- built lenses and puts out enough contrast and resolution to compete with the


AM 4 2011 ©cybertrek 2011


© SCOTT MCDONALD, HEDRICH-BLESSING


© SCOTT MCDONALD, HEDRICH-BLESSING


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86