This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PROFILE


CHIP CLEARY IAAPA’S NEWLY APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND CEO TELLS KATHLEEN


WHYMAN ABOUT THE CHALLENGES OF RUNNING A GLOBAL ASSOCIATION AND THE IMPACT THAT SOCIAL MEDIA’S HAVING ON THE INDUSTRY


How do your responsibilities differ from chair to CEO of IAAPA? As chair, from 2009 to 2010, I was a vol- unteer and had a regular day job [as vice president of Palace Entertainment]. At that altitude you’re working for the guidance of the future blueprint of the organisation. As the CEO and president, you really get down to the nuts and bolts. I joined the staff here in Washington DC, US in April 2011 and am charged with tak- ing the vision of both the strategic plan and the business plan and implementing it. Many of us in the world of IAAPA dream,


want and know that it can become even greater and better around the world. This was an opportunity for me to bring some of the skill sets I’ve acquired during my 30 years in the business to the association to help it move into the next phase.


What is the next phase? When a new executive comes on board, it’s always a good time to question every- thing that’s being done. I’m going through each and every budget, looking at every line and every item. We recently had a meeting with all of our staff to discuss what we’re doing right and what we can do better. We identifi ed that IAAPA has got behind in the technologi- cal world – now we’re working quickly to get ourselves to where we need to be. We’re modernising the main


software that we use to com- municate with our members and have already migrated to a new system for our trade show soft- ware, which we use to sell our booths. We can go out to exhibi-


tors on the trade show fl oor and, using an iPad or a tablet device, talk to them about their booth. It also allows all of our offi ces around the world to be united using the same software. Global development and expansion is


another big area. We have fantastic offi ces in Europe, led by Karen Staley and Jakob Wahl; in Latin America, headed by Paulina Reyes; and in Asia run by Andrew Lee. All these offi ces are working to support our mission around the world. Next year you’ll see the beginnings of a few initiatives that we’ve started, including holding a record number of safety seminars, which are extremely popular, in all regions around the world. I think that will help solidify our position of being the leading providers of education, networking and connectivity.


How have your fi rst six months been? Invigorating, exciting, demanding and chal- lenging. We’re a 93-year-old organisation, but we don’t feel old. We want people to view IAAPA as a young pup that’s out there doing what it needs to do. In my fi rst six months, I’ve focused on


understanding how and why things work, and questioned everything. It’s been an exciting time for me and the staff, as there were many issues they wanted to move forward with. We’re attacking these issues and trying to streamline things, so we can keep the focus on delivering the best product to our members. It’ll take time, but we’re heading in the right direction.


What are your plans for IAAPA? Strengthening our offi ces in Europe, Asia and Latin America is a high priority. You can only deliver a service when you have people that speak the language in the area,


“IAAPA’S 93-YEARS-OLD, BUT WE DON’T FEEL OLD. WE WANT PEOPLE TO VIEW IAAPA AS A YOUNG PUP THAT’S DOING WHAT IT NEEDS TO DO”


AM 4 2011 ©cybertrek 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86