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Through the established Wisconsin school music programs, we can engage our students in the pursuit of their music education to create value, to express their souls, maybe even to the point of receiv- ing a Grammy nomination. Then again, maybe that’s not what they actually want, and the experience they gain from being


surrounded by music will be enough. Clearly for Geoffrey Keezer, it is the ulti- mate goal, and he’s already achieved it.


Coral Graszer is WSMA’s media relations intern and a current English and communication arts student at UW-Madison. Email: cgraszer@wsmamusic.org


bonus material to his CD, something Keezer himself is a huge fan of. Keezer says he initially liked the new way of funding his CD because the fans have more control; “They kick in whatever amount they want.” It is a new alternative to producing a CD now that record com- pani e s a r e changing be- fore our eyes.


Message to Those Teaching Music Though Keezer has accomplished much in his musical career thus far, he wants to make sure that he is not touted as any sort of supernatural song-writing sensation. “As artists, we’re all a little bit weird in the first place. We kind of hold this mysti- cal position in society as being somewhat removed, exempt from the laws of physics to everyone else, but we’re not.” He says music teachers just need to encourage their students and be supportive of the music programs already in place. “More than anything, just being around the programs” is what will encourage students today to do as Keezer did, to arrange and compose and play music.


Wisconsin School Musician 35


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