This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
3 ways to cut costs


In my other life, I manage a Winter Sports School, that sells a variety of products, including ski and snowboard lessons for children and adults. We employ nearly 100 instructors, and each instructor specializes in teaching either skiing or snowboarding. Because demand for ski-specific, or snowboard- specific, lessons is difficult to predict, scheduling the right number of ski and snowboard instructors can often be a challenging task. Fortunately, many of our ski instructors can also teach snowboarding if needed, and vice versa. This pool of instructors, that can teach both skiing and snowboarding, allows us to sell more lessons, without having to hire more instructors that can teach only one discipline. By hiring fewer employees, we find other savings, such as ordering a smaller number of employee uniforms, decreased expenses in unemployment insurance, and a lower risk for worker’s compensation.


2. Making the Most of Hourly Employees


Most small companies hire at least some hourly employees, because hourly employees can provide many benefits to an organization. Hourly employees are reasonably easy to budget for, reasonably easy to schedule, and reasonably inexpensive to hire. Sometimes, however, it isn’t always as easy to get the most out of hourly employees. For example, hourly employees will earn the same money for a difficult eight hour shift, as for an easy eight hour shift. The wage is based on the time spent, rather than the work accomplished.


Making the most of hourly employees can be a challenge, but there are ways to increase productivity without increasing expense.


First, watch the time clock. Understanding the need to develop an easy to manage time clock policy should be a no-brainer, but actually developing a policy that is easy to manage might be a different story. For some companies with more than a few employees, simply keeping track of employee hours can be a daunting task. In addition to simply adding hours, keeping track of employee trends, such as clocking in early, clocking out late, and tardiness, can be difficult to detect. Most companies have automatic time clocks that can create punch detail reports that record these trends. If your company has an automatic time clock, half of the battle is won. Detecting the problems, however, aren’t always as simple as addressing the problems. A good start would be to develop a “punch policy” that requires employees to clock-in or clock-out within a specified number of minutes before or after a shift. Some automatic time clocks will not allow employees to clock in before or after a certain time.


Besides time-clock issues, motivating hourly employees can also be a challenge. Because hourly employee wage is based on time rather than production, it is the manager’s job to motivate and inspire workers to maintain appropriate productivity levels. Management training (notice


scrapbook business 21


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com