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Member Section


Competition ...any other business A roundup of news from Chamber members


Jack-of-all-trades: Sam Bruce


Sam gets a buzz out of varied Wasps role


From dog-sitter to locksmith, one woman from Coventry is in a league of her own when it comes to supporting Wasps’ elite athletes


away from the pitch. Sam Bruce, from Longford, is still pinching


herself at the role she landed at one of rugby’s most famous names three-and-a-half years ago, which saw her go from being a steward and receptionist at Ricoh Arena to rugby administrator, assisting elite rugby players on a daily basis. The 46-year-old said her duties stretched far


beyond that of an administrator for the 45 first- team players and 29 backroom staff. “It’s a job like no other, I just love the variety


that comes with it,” said Sam, who attends every home game as a supporter. “My job title can be a bit deceiving. Alongside


administrative duties – such as wages, invoicing and logistical tasks – I also act as a personal assistant for players should they ever need support.


“For new signings, this can range from hiring


cars and arranging house viewings, through to driving them to medical appointments if they have a serious injury, and on the odd occasion, even dog-sitting. “You have to remember that for some of the


overseas players, they have moved to England and are away from some of their family, so I try my best to ensure they are as settled as can be – which ultimately helps them to perform to the best of their ability on the pitch. “I initially joined Ricoh Arena as a steward to


work around looking after my young son. Fast forward five-and-a-half years and never did I think I would be in a position where I am working with elite rugby players on a daily basis. “I absolutely love my job at Wasps – no two


days are the same – and when I look back now at my journey since joining Ricoh Arena, I still have to pinch myself.”


Top deck front row is top seat


National Express West Midlands has unveiled passengers’ favourite spot to sit on the bus. An online poll organised by the


bus and coach operator found that more than half of respondents, 55 per cent, said that the front row seats on the top deck was their favourite seat on the bus. Other passenger favourites included on the bottom deck next to the driver, on the bottom deck, back row middle seat and on the top deck back row. The poll was sparked by


passengers using the hashtag #TDFR, which stands for Top Deck, Front Row. Passengers would use the hashtag if they had been able to secure the popular seat when travelling on National Express West Midlands services. David Bradford, National Express


West Midlands managing director, said: “We started to notice the hashtag #TDFR and others cropping up in our social media mentions, amongst other mentions about timetables and tickets. “When we started following the


90 CHAMBERLINK April 2020 Top deck travel: A West Midlands bus


#TDFR hashtag we realised it was a really simple game that most people can take part in. There’s clearly a lot of love out there for our buses, so we wanted to put it out there and see which of our bus seats really was the most popular. “We’ve enjoyed looking at all the


photos, videos and comments from customers who took part in the poll.” Benjamin Kane, from Kings


Heath, is a regular traveller on the National Express 50 route, and has regularly used the hashtag in his adoration for the seat. He said: “Over the years, I’ve


become quite well known for the #TDFR hashtag and it’s really picked up recently. I knew I was on to something – something that everyone can relate to.”


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