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Business News Digital agency continues to grow


Digital marketing agency Lightbox Digital has added an experienced developer and studio manager to its fast-growing team. Ben Goodman brings his design,


production, and website management expertise to the Birmingham-based agency after working with clients such as St Mary’s Hospice and Birmingham venture capital firm, Midven. Joining him is studio manager Michaela Higgins, who will work closely with the account management team to oversee the delivery of all website projects and digital marketing work, as well as ensuring the agency is efficient, meets its deadlines and continues to be profitable. With a collective decade of


agency experience, Ben will be involved in a number of existing and brand new website projects from the onset, while Michaela, who has previously worked with Nike and contract logistics company Howard Tenens, will be responsible for being a key communicator between the developer, design and account management teams in a project management role. Rob Pollard, founder of Lightbox Digital, which is based in


Rugby venue to


support inclusivity Ricoh Arena and Wasps have bolstered their commitment to inclusivity after signing up to a scheme that supports those with hidden disabilities. Visitors to the venue will


soon be able to pick up a sunflower-themed lanyard to signify they have a disability or condition that is not obvious. The lanyards will be permanently available at Wasps’ ticket office and at Ricoh Arena’s main reception for the 1.3 million visitors that pass through its doors every year for live sport, music, conferences and exhibitions. Jordan Young, senior


community development officer at Wasps, said: “Not all disabilities are obvious, and these lanyards will play a crucial role in notifying venue staff and other visitors that the lanyard wearers may require additional assistance. “We will be training as many


of our staff as we can around increasing understanding of disabilities, and how we can make a positive impact across the business for customers with disabilities.”


36 CHAMBERLINK April 2020 Expanding team: PJ Ellis (commercial director), Michaela Higgins, Ben Goodman and Rob Pollard


Birmingham’s Jewellery Quarter, said: “In these times of worry and uncertainty, I’m delighted we’re in a position where we can add two fantastic members of staff to the agency in Michaela and Ben. “Both have very experienced skill sets and will bring a wealth of


knowledge and proficiency to Lightbox. We are looking forward to them settling in and working with everyone to continue achieving great results to our range of clients.” Ben and Michaela’s


appointments follow on from the


Funding set to energise low carbon scheme


A programme that supports SMEs in Greater Birmingham and Solihull to adopt low carbon energy technologies and applications is to be rolled out across the region after securing funding. The ATETA (Accelerating Thermal Energy Adoption)


programme is led by the Birmingham Energy Institute at the University of Birmingham and funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). Since its launch in 2017 it has offered advice and support to more than 100 businesses within the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership. The programme has now secured fresh funding from


the ERDF to extend support across a further four Local Enterprise Partnerships: the Black Country; Coventry and Warwickshire; Worcestershire and the Marches. Through ATETA support, businesses have the


opportunity to collaborate with an experienced team of Knowledge Exchange Fellows to improve their research and development and identify new market opportunities. In particular, Knowledge Exchange Fellows work with


SMEs to: • Develop and commercialise energy products or services • Provide a platform to test and demonstrate innovative ideas in the University’s state-of-the-art laboratories


• Open doors to new energy markets and technologies • Solve business problems • Provide access to energy market intelligence • Unlock new opportunities.


Energy help: David Terry


To date the programme has succeeded in generating a


net income of almost £25 million for the local economy. ATETA’s Business Engagement Manager David Terry


says: “Our aim is to help businesses in the region achieve clean, secure and affordable energy systems. That means helping SMEs solve the problems that are stopping them from succeeding in this area so they can grow their business at the same time as taking those vital steps towards a low carbon future.” Projects ATETA has engaged with include advising


on novel trading arrangements for domestic electricity supplies, assisting manufacturers working to capture, store and reuse heat and power, and supporting projects for the electrification of transport and the introduction of new transport fuels.


To find out if your business is eligible for ATETA support, contact ateta@contacts.bham.ac.uk


trio of new hires earlier this year. They were office manager


Sharon Whyley and account managers David Callaghan and Sophie Powell.


• More patron news on pages 38 and 39


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