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Business News


Dr Daniel: The Oscar winning actor receives his honorary doctorate


Language experts tackle ‘Dark Web’


A rollout of evidence-based linguistic training for undercover police officers could help them catch more paedophiles who target children online, a new book suggests.


‘Language and Online Identities:


The Undercover Policing of Internet Sexual Crime’ by forensic linguistic experts Professor Tim Grant of Aston University and Dr Nicci MacLeod of Northumbria University examines how effective training can help officers infiltrate paedophile networks on the ‘Dark Web’ to identify victims and apprehend offenders. Using a wealth of disturbing


Oscar winner’s uni honour


Multi-Oscar-winning actor Sir Daniel Day-Lewis has been presented with an Honorary Doctorate from Birmingham City University in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the acting profession. He received the honour during a ceremony held at


the university’s Royal Birmingham Conservatoire. The award was presented to coincide with the


opening of a new exhibition which honours the work of Sir Daniel’s grandfather, film producer Sir Michael Balcon, who was knighted for his services to British cinema in 1948.


Sir Daniel has won the Oscar for ‘Best Actor’ three


times for his roles in ‘My Left Foot’, ‘There Will Be Blood’ and ‘Lincoln’. The installation went on display to members of the


public at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire. The honour was conferred by Professor Philip


Plowden, vice-chancellor of Birmingham City University, who said: “It is our honour to have been able to present Sir Daniel with this award, which is a mark of the incredible contribution he has made over the course of a career spanning nearly 50 years.”


examples drawn from instant messaging chatlogs, as well as secretive Dark Web chatrooms and police training dialogues, the authors outline how offenders create assumed identities to groom their victims, sometimes pursuing them using several different personas. Professor Tim Grant said: “The


use of forensic linguistics as a crime-fighting tool is about taking the lessons we learn in analysing language to increase the police’s chances of catching offenders and identifying and rescuing victims.”


April 2020 CHAMBERLINK 19


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