search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Business News with environmental responsibility


Growing demand: Despite coronavirus and Boeing’s woes, there is still a need for new aircraft


“illegal”. Interestingly, though it is the operator, Heathrow Airport, who is seeking redress in the Courts and not the Department of Transport.


‘We can expect the current crop of new aircraft to last for around 25 years before they are replaced’


The premise is, of course, that by


having a key fully functioning hub airport, the economic advantages outweigh the environmental and climate impacts. Now here’s the funny thing. Some eight years ago a number of people


were saying “don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and make use of existing assets connected by great sustainable ground infrastructure with air connectivity provided by aircraft designed to meet the market demand. Very soon Airbus will close the A380 production line and like Boeing will concentrate on producing hub-busting point-to- point serving aircraft like their A350 and the latter’s B787. However, there is still the climate


change issue to deal with. Aviation currently produces between two- three per cent of global emissions and this will rise proportionately as other industries cut back and we aren’t going to see large electric aircraft in the very near future to


compensate. We can expect the current crop of new aircraft to last for around 25 years before they are replaced. Some offsetting can be achieved


but unless the aviation industry grasps the climate change nettle with alacrity, the pressure to reduce its impact will become even greater. When aviation managers say it is our intention to achieve carbon zero but advise they don’t know how just yet, they should expect to be called out by those who just say stop. It is important to have a


coordinated response to climate change and it must be promulgated at an international level. The recent Covid-19 impacts on China have


been socially and economically damaging but one thing has improved and that is the air quality as a result of the lower industrial and transport emissions output over recent weeks. While Covid-19 may have killed thousands, more lives may have been saved by the


reduction in smog and pollutants in many Chinese cities. Perhaps Greta Thunberg and the


environmental movement have an important point to make and it is one which the UK courts recognised also in the case of the Heathrow decision; the economy and the environment must move forward in harmony so that all can benefit from improved connectivity and a better quality environment.


April 2020 CHAMBERLINK 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92