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ABCC ABCC Patrons Premier+ Partners


Spectacular: Last year’s award winners


Dinner and awards back in November


Asian Business Chamber of Commerce (ABCC)’s annual dinner and awards spectacular will be returning. The Chamber has confirmed that its dinner and


awards will take place on 21 November at the National Motorcycle Museum in Solihull, for the second year running. At last year’s awards, more than 500 business


people from across Greater Birmingham attended the event, which saw sexual violence support service RSVP pick up the coveted ABCC Business of the Year award. ABCC director, Anjum Khan, said that the


Chamber’s flagship event was a highlight for many members of the ABCC and businesses across Greater Birmingham. She said: “I’m really pleased to announce that


our annual dinner and awards will be returning for its 33rd year. “We aim to make the awards a tremendous


show of the best businesses across the region, especially highlighting those businesses tackling and championing key issues to the ABCC, such as diversity and inclusion. “This year’s awards will be no different, and will again be a highlight for numerous businesses as


Charities team up for sister act


Birmingham-based Rape & Sexual Violence Project (RSVP), 2019 winner of the Asian Business Chamber of Commerce’s (ABCC) ‘Business of the Year’ and ‘Outstanding Charity of the Year’ awards, has gained a new sister organisation. RSVP, which supports people in Birmingham


and Solihull who have been affected by rape, sexual assault and sexual abuse has been joined by GINA, a social enterprise providing private, specialist support for individuals subjected to sexual violence and abuse. GINA provides private, specialist, trauma-


informed counselling for individuals subjected to sexual violence and abuse. Face-to-face counselling is available in Birmingham and telephone counselling available nationwide. Specialist support is available, and there is no


waiting list for those who want to access the organisation’s support services. All of GINA’s profits are donated to RSVP,


which offers a wide range of free, confidential services to those who have been affected by rape and sexual abuse including counselling, as well as telephone helpline support and specialist support for those in the LGBT community who have experienced rape, sexual assault or sexual abuse.


Sister organisations: Lucy Hebberts, GINA’s business lead, (left) and Sophie Fletcher, RSVP’s community fundraiser


Lisa Thompson, chief executive of RSVP, said:


“When you support GINA, you help to create a future where individuals subjected to sexual violence and abuse can fulfil their potential and seize opportunities to grow, inspire, nurture and achieve. “With GINA profits being donated to RSVP,


GINA will help to create a sustainable future for RSVP and create positive legacies for survivors who access services.”


part of our network and demonstrate those exemplary organisations doing fantastic things across the region.” Sponsorship opportunities, ticket and award


nomination details will be revealed during the coming months via the Greater Birmingham Chambers of Commerce’s communications channels.


To find out more, subscribe to Chamberlink Daily and the ABCC’s monthly newsletter by visiting greaterbirminghamchambers.com/latest-news/ subscribe-to-our-newsletter/


Lottery funding will tell stories of war


Birmingham charity New Hope Global has received £63,000 from the National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) for a new project it has launched, ‘Showcasing the Stories of Bangladesh Liberation War’. The project will focus on recording and


exploring the events of the 1971 war among the South Asian communities in Birmingham. The war saw Bangladesh gain its independence from Pakistan, but New Hope believes that the history of what happened is unknown to the younger generations. The war only lasted nine months, and


ended just two weeks after India joined in after being itself attacked by Pakistan. Millions of Bengali refugees fled over the border to India during the conflict. To enlighten those unaware of what happened during the war, New Hope aims to hold screenings of documentaries and stage arts and crafts workshops about it, as well as photo exhibitions and illustrated talks by the freedom fighters themselves.


April 2020 CHAMBERLINK 53


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