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AT THE START


OF A LONG LIFE SOMETIMES FOSTERING IS NEEDED By Emmy Lindsey, Team Manager, Fostering and Adoption Jersey


Fostering and Adoption Jersey is part of Children’s Social Care and providing children with high quality foster carers and adopters is at the heart of what the team does. Our work as a fostering and adoption service means that we help prospective foster carers and adopters through every stage.


Foster carers make a huge difference to the lives of children and young people. A supportive and caring environment gives them the opportunity to achieve more and have higher aspirations. Dedicated foster carers help make sure that being in care is no barrier to young people achieving their ambitions. Foster carers can offer a firm, caring and supportive foundation which can help children move into a future with confidence.


We are very fortunate in Jersey to have many wonderful foster carers but there is still a real need for more people to come forward. We want to be able to offer the right family placement for the children who come into our care.


Children should be able to live with a foster carer whose skills and experience make them ideally suited to meet their individual


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needs. A wider pool of foster carers with the right skills and qualities would make it more likely that the right homes can be found for children first time, giving them the best chance of stability.


Foster carers provide children with their day-to-day care, but fostering is much more than this. Foster carers may have to help these children come to terms with difficult or traumatic experiences. They support children in their education, look after their health and promote social wellbeing. The role is varied and challenging, and also includes attending meetings, keeping records, managing behaviour and promoting contact with birth families.


Some children will need to be looked after for only a short time


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