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Some questions for JON


Question: What do you do to unwind at the end of a long day? Answer:


I love spending time with my family, so catching up with them


at the end of the day is really important to me. I like nothing more than chatting with my children and hearing about all the goings on in their lives, it’s great for putting my day into perspective..


Question: What do you like the most about being a Sales Director? Answer:


meetings, or meeting my colleagues to discuss current and future client projects. I often have to generate key reports for our business. Other times, I might simply be authorising a holiday or travel application for one of my team.


me ti


I try to leave the office by 6:00p.m. in order to spend time with my family in the evening but as I have a client-facing role and a very busy diary, I often find myself meeting clients at events after work, or `plugging in’ at home to stay on top of things before morning.


I love the variety of my role and the pace at which we have to


work to ensure our clients are happy. I work with people who live in jurisdictions around the world and who work in all sorts of sectors, which makes my work really interesting. Focusing on the delivery of our clients’ projects and seeing them through to completion is incredibly challenging but also very satisfying and definitely one of the things I like most about my work.


Question: What do you dislike most about being a Sales Director? Answer:


Honestly, there’s not a lot that I don’t like about my job.


There are times when I have to make some tough decisions, which isn’t particularly nice but it is part of my role and I accept it as one of my responsibilities.


Question: How did you become a Sales Director? Answer:


Throughout my career, I’ve worked in commercial roles and


have been with Sure for the past 10 years. When I started, one of the first things to hit me was just how interesting and exciting the telecoms industry is. Telecoms changes on a daily basis, and is part of the technology sector that’s transforming our world. I realised very soon after starting that I wanted to stay with Sure and work hard to progress my career.


So far, my career has developed really well here. I began as Enterprise Account Director before becoming Head of Enterprise Sales (Jersey). Today, I’m the Sales Director for Sure’s Channel Islands and Isle of Man group, so I’m pleased that my plan to develop my career at Sure has so far, worked very well.


When the Sales Director role became available, it felt like a natural progression to me, so I was delighted to be appointed.


Question: What advice would you give someone, either just starting their career or midway through their career, who wants to be a Sales Director?


Answer: If you want to progress in any career you have to start with a good `work ethic’, there is no substitute for hard work.


You should also be passionate and invested in the work you do and the products or services that your company sells. When someone is passionate about their products, it creates a more engaging experience for clients who can see that you genuinely believe in the services you’re selling.


Perhaps the biggest advice I would give to anybody embarking in a career in Sales however, is develop your listening skills, above everything else it is the key to a successful sales career. By really getting to know your customers and their business needs, delivering against them, and holding your hands up when you can’t, you will cement trusted long term business relationships.


DELIVERING 20/20 A day in the life of... Page 105


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