This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
IT'S THE PROOF


IN THE PUDDING THAT COUNTS by Senator Philip Ozouf


Reflecting on my first two and a half years as the Assistant Chief Minister of Jersey, it is obvious that there are many opportunities for Jersey, but also one very big challenge.


The four policy areas I am responsible for - competition, digital, financial services and innovation - all present Government with a variety of challenges, but most importantly a world of opportunity. It is a privilege to be working in Government alongside a team of committed Ministers, driving forward a vision that will deliver jobs and opportunities for Islanders in all areas of work, in support of a stable and prosperous future.


But there is a central challenge common to many advanced Western countries, and to the relationship between Government and society, that poses a significant long-term threat. The proportion of the elderly among our population is inexorably edging up at an astonishing rate. The 3% natural growth rate of the Island population by 2035 is dwarfed by


Page 22 An Ageing Island


the two-thirds growth there will be in the number of those aged over 65.


This is in many ways a sign of our success. People are living longer thanks to advances in medicine and the economic growth achieved over the recent centuries. Our strengths in agriculture, fisheries and more recently finance have paved the way for a healthy, and relatively wealthy society.


Our economic growth in 2015 was 2.2%, more than double that expected by the Fiscal Policy Panel. The low inflation we have seen since 2013 has contributed to a sustained growth in real earnings, as have lower prices for things like oil and food.


We remain in a strong position - Jersey has little debt,


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116