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Some questions for Lucy


Question: What do you do to unwind at the end of a long day? Answer: The evenings are mostly spent in or near the kitchen as I love to cook and my family loves to eat. Cooking is probably the only thing that truly calms me (it’s also probably the only domestic thing I’m any good at). Being creative in the kitchen and chilling out with a glass of red is my ideal way to end a long day. A bath, a book (or boxset) and I’m one happy human being.


Question: What do you like the most about being a Freelance Writer? Answer: I love the diversity of the work I do; the interesting people I meet, the research and reading, the social aspect of my job and the fact that I have the freedom to manage my own time.


Question: What do you dislike most about being a a Freelance Writer? Answer: Being freelance can be hard - tackling procrastination or going off at a tangent means I spend more time than I’ve quoted for! Clients probably love it though and I am a perfectionist when it comes to attention to detail, so I guess it balances out.


impromptu cake after school, is a blessing that comes with managing my own time. Once the fire cracker gets out of school, or her after-school clubs, we get up to all manner of things. Working as a freelance writer means being motivated and having the ability to switch off; yet another paradox. When my family is home and it’s out of hours, my Mac is shutdown for the night (or until everyone’s asleep anyway).


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My work day ends when the job is done, or when I’ve literally run out of steam.


Question: How did you become a a Freelance Writer? Answer: I’ve always been a writer - not that I’d have described myself as one when I was 15 or so… although I wrote, even then. The actual work came about when I commented to a mag designer about the ‘flaccid’ content in a publication that he was working on. He told his boss, they asked me to go in and talk to them and they basically offered me a job there and then, writing pretty much the whole mag. That opened my eyes to the potential of writing for a living; since then I’ve written for lots of other magazines, here and off-island and I now write more commercial copy for anything from websites, brochures and e-mail marketing, to radio and TV adverts, slogans, strap lines and all sorts in between.


Question: What advice would you give someone, either just starting their career or midway through their career, who wants to be a Freelance Writer?


Answer: Read and write every day. Get a notebook and literally start writing; find out what things interest you - do you want to report, write commercial copy or fiction? The more you read, the better you write. You have to have a great command of the English language and words have to interest and intrigue you - I personally don’t see a degree as being of much importance; if you can write, then go for it. Submit work to local publications - set up a portfolio of your work - get your name out to agencies in the market for copywriters… Oh, and don’t be offended when you get no recognition for pieces -you can't be precious about your work when it's for other people. They basically own your voice so make sure you get paid for it. I’d also say that writing freelance means that you need to be able to lead your readers, so stay informed, be up to date on subjects of importance, including communications and technology - it’s an ever changing and competitive landscape and following the latest practices is something clients should expect of you.


INFORMED 20/20 A day in the life of... Page 113


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