This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Some questions for Joan


Question: What do you do to unwind at the end of a long day? Answer: I enjoy spending time with my husband and two sons, sharing a meal at home or going out as a family. In the summer I enjoy playing golf at St.Clements, and in winter I try to play social tennis with a great group of friends at Grainville Tennis Club under the flood lights.


Question: What do you like the most about being a Social Activities Organiser?


Answer: The variety. My job has taken me as far away as Bad Wurzach and Buckingham Palace, and I have organised many fantastic parties, events and celebrations. It gives me great job satisfaction to see our residents enjoying themselves, joining in and sharing activities with their families and friends.


Question: What do you dislike most about being a Social Activities Organiser?


Answer: Not being able to fulfill every request from my residents, as I really don't like having to say no. There is also not enough time in the day, as often residents just want someone to chat to and share their memories.


and we draw up a list for the week, to give everyone an opportunity to go, whether in a wheelchair or not. We are enablers, not disablers!


We have just lost our volunteer driver, Bryan Renouf, after sixteen years so I am back in the driving seat. Some of our residents call me the girl who drives the big bus, although the girl bit is very flattering!!


The residents choose where they would like to go, and a favourite at the moment is a certain establishment at St.Catherine's for the lovely ice cream and donuts!


Those not on this trip can enjoy their favourite movie, complete with popcorn, and it will be their turn on the next drive. They eagerly await our return, as we often have extra donuts for them, and we will share afternoon teas and tales of our travels and their films. If it's been their favourite film, The Sound of Music, we will all join in with the last ‘do re me!’


They say time flies, and it certainly does for me, so it's time for me to go home to my family, even though I have felt at home with my special friends and family all day. What a great way to think of one's work........aren't I lucky!


20/20 A day in the life of... Page 111


Question: How did you become a Social Activities Organiser? Answer: I had a successful career in retail management, but with two sons I didn't want to work full time. I had already been involved in organising events on a voluntary basis, so this new role gave me an opportunity and a new challenge. I feel privileged to have developed this role which is now seen as necessary to enhance the quality of social activities in care settings.


Question: What advice would you give someone, either just starting their career or midway through their career, who wants to be a Social Activities Organiser?


Answer: Go for it, but be prepared for hard work. You will need lots of enthusiasm and motivation and will have to work as part of a team. A lot of our clients are not in care by choice, so in this role it is up to you to encourage them to join in and enjoy their lives, and enhance the quality of care that the home provides.


It also helps if you can sing and dance, and although I can't do either very well, my residents tell me I make up for it with my energy and enthusiasm, as well as supplying many cups of tea and coffee.


ENTHUSIASTIC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116