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The focus is on supporting individuals in caring for themselves, rather than undertaking tasks for them, thereby increasing independence and increasing the likelihood that they can continue to live in the community.


One of our key initiatives is the Rapid Response and Reablement Team (RRRT) which was set up in May 2014 to target avoidable hospital admissions and to support timely discharge of patients. An additional crisis support team was integrated into the RRRT in December 2014 to add further capacity. This service is delivered by Family Nursing & Home Care, a key community and voluntary sector partner.


The multi-disciplinary, integrated team, available 13 hours per day 7 hours a week, provides care in the community and responds promptly to crises or escalating needs to avoid a hospital admission or to expedite a hospital discharge. The team works closely with the individual’s GP. The RRRT determines which clinical or social services are required to manage the situation and will provide practical and clinical support from a few days to a few weeks, with the aim of stabilising the person’s needs and helping to maintain them at home or through a safe transition from an acute hospital stay back to their home. The focus is on supporting individuals in caring for themselves, rather than undertaking tasks for them, thereby increasing independence and increasing the likelihood that they can continue to live in the community. If the person’s needs cannot be stabilised in their own home, and acute medical care is found to be necessary, then there will be smooth transition to hospital care.


Feedback from service users has been very positive, highlighting alternatives to a hospital stay, the quick response to referrals, and the success in managing a varied and extensive range of conditions within the community. In its first year, the RRRT managed 677 patients, of which 281 were prevented from being admitted to hospital and 396 individuals were supported with an early discharge from hospital. The average length of care provided was four days for rapid response, seven days for crisis support and 17 days for reablement. A total of 561 patients were discharged home and 40 returned to


hospital. 86% of referrals for rapid response and 80% of referrals for crisis support were responded to within two hours.


In addition, the long-term care scheme introduced in July 2014 has, for the first time, offered assistance with costs for people cared for in their own home. This facilitates the policy of encouraging community-based care, supporting approved care packages at home delivered by a range of HSSD-approved homecare providers.


The wider community has a role to play in preventing social isolation and loneliness, and community support and friendship groups run by volunteers with part funding from my department (such as Good Companions and Communicare), help individuals to live more independently. Jersey Post’s ‘Call and Check’ scheme and the Silver Line service also play their part. Such support allows people ‘to live, not just exist’.


Other initiatives have included investing in older adult mental health services in response to the growth in dementia in the over 65s, where the focus is on early diagnosis and support for families. In addition we try to improve the lives of older people by enhancing our business as usual by, for example, free shingles vaccines for 70 year olds, the annual flu vaccination programme and promoting regular exercise and healthy living.


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An Ageing Island


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