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It is certainly a more beneficial habit than sitting in front of a TV watching football.


Wh t er r


Whatever route is chosen, the Exercise Referral team hope that they have started people on a new chapter in their lives where a little more exercise becomes a habit and makes them happier and healthier. It is certainly a more beneficial habit than sitting in front of a TV watching football.


Facts and Figures (Source: Annual Report 2015)


Number of referrals received 1000 approximately


Over 600 clients were over the age 55 of which 240 are over the age of 70


It is not only the body that can benefit, although most exercise programmes are put together for people recovering from surgery or an illness. Mental problems can also be eased by exercise which increases the production of endomorphines. Other referrals are for people who feel there is something lacking in their lives, and exercise could help but they don't know where to start.


It is not only the body that can benefit although most


That's where the Exercise Referral Scheme is of great benefit. Established in 1995, it has played a pivotal roll in the rehabilitation of health in the Island. The primary objective is to rehabilitate those who are recovering from an operation or chronic disease. To do that there is a professional team of one full-time Senior Exercise Referral Practitioner and eight part-time Exercise Referral Tutors.


The Process


Either a GP or a health practitioner can refer their clients into the scheme. Once referred, clients must attend an initial assessment which enables the assessor to obtain an overview of their medical conditions, their primary reason for referral as well as current medication and lifestyle.


Clients are then invited to attend Exercise Referral sessions which are available at Fort Regent, Springfield and Les Quennevais on a daily basis. There are a range of sessions on offer from studio based circuits classes to gym sessions, and Pilates, Yoga and aqua classes are also available. The sessions are supervised and take place during the morning, afternoon or evenings so clients have a wide variety of options.


After completing 20 sessions (at a recommended rate of 2-3 times a week) clients are reassessed and a progress report and feedback is forwarded to their GP and other referring agent. Following that assessment clients can stay on the scheme for a further 15 sessions if further rehabilitation is required. Alternatively they are given a variety of options so that they can continue their healthier lifestyle. This could involve attending community based exercise referral classes or buying a gym membership.


The top three primary reasons for referral were: • Post-operative recovery • Back pain • Arthritis


Using secondary data from the SOJ Statistic Unit, it is evident there is a change in the islands ageing demographics and people are living longer. For Exercise Referral this means there is the probability of more clients being referred into the scheme. In addition an ageing population means an increase in operations and a rise in co-morbidity conditions. This is evident from the top three medical conditions which are associated with people over the age of 70.


The top three referring agents were: • JGH Physio Department • GP’s • Cardiac Rehabilitation


Of the referrals received Body Mass Index (BMI) showed: • 21% were of normal weight • 36% were overweight • 24% were obese category 1 • 11% were obese category 2 • 7% were obese category 3


EXERCISE REFERRAL SCHEME


Telephone: 01534 449793 E-mail: exercisereferral.gov.je


PROVIDING ISLANDERS WITH SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE FOR REHABILITATION OF THEIR MEDICAL CONDITIONS.


An Ageing Island Page 33


FORT REGENT LES QUENNEVAIS SPRINGFIELD


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