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Benchmark


2018 THE GARDEN MARKET SUPPLEMENT DIY WEEK INDEX: DIY WEEK index


1. Woodcote Green 2. Bents


3. Gordale


4. Blue Diamond 5. Haskins Whitehall Squires


6. 7.


8. Scotsdale 9. Webbs


10. Chessington 11. Stewarts 12. Hillier


13. Klondyke 14. Garsons 15. Aylett


16. Wyevale 17. Millbrook 18. Hayes


19. Nottcuts 20. Polhill


21. Van Hage


22. Barton Grange 23. Frosts


24. Coolings 25. Planters 26. Dobbies Average


5-year Latest


average year 580


413 376


501 -1


year 811


WOODCOTE GREEN STILL ON TOP -2


year 516


360 1,270 169 (57) 236 854


295 204 389 523 275 173 (27) 483 247 299 597 363 235 261 42 259 227 319 80 266 193 69 179 400 158


(57) 100 484


123 162 151 212 114 198 163 81 113 288 43 32 87 263 26 1 82 78 (26) 98 62


(440) 326 167


(14) (26) (44) (58) (71)


(271)


56 60 115 39 31 3 43 100 21 42 41 70 4 (13) 29 13 (52)


7 (113) (126) 46 134


7 (108) (76) 167 (54) (432) 47 (252) (171) (3)


123 106 157 123


Source: DIY Week analysis of fi led company accounts 14 DIY WEEK GARDEN MARKET SUPPLEMENT


-3 year


1,257 234 876 264 656 87


472 419 313 243 160 147 71


172 222 201


(31) (1) 6 7


-4


year (183)


34


(31) 98 89


(109) 143 52 3


21


(72) (16) 132 (26) 40 57 98 9


(54) (13)


(41) (32) 46 22


18 (1,435.0)


254 11 53


235


(69) (66)


(227) 8


12 (4)


T


he DIY Week Index is intended to be read as an approximate indicator of a company’s overall competitiveness. It


is arrived at by multiplying what we have long considered to be the three most signifi cant performance indicators for any retail company: sales growth, stockturn, and operating margin. For example, a company which has grown its year-on-year sales by 5%, achieved a stockturn of 4.5 times, and recorded an operating margin of 8%, will get a DIY Week Index score of 5 x 4.5 x 8 = 180. Obviously it’s possible to achieve a negative Index score – all you have to do is record either a decline in sales, or an operating loss.


It is of course


possible that a decline in sales might be attributable to a strategic withdrawal from an unprofi table sector, or to the closure of a loss-making branch. Equally, in a market dominated by privately owned and owner-managed businesses, it’s entirely possible that an operating loss might be the result of a decision to re-invest in the business rather than take the profi ts. And it’s equally possible to achieve a very high Index score if you happen to be signifi cantly ahead of the industry average on any one of the three key indicators. This is borne out by the company at the top of this chart: Woodcote Green. Its key strength is its extraordinarily high stockturn fi gure, which gives it a huge advantage when calculating the Index scores. Behind Woodcote Green, however,


comes a string of operators whose chief characteristic is not just that they are good at what they do, but they are consistently good at what they do. Among the top 10 companies in this table, for instance, there are only six instances in the past fi ve years of a negative Index score. If you’re a garden centre operator looking for investment, this would be a good point to share with your potential investors: that garden centre retailing, traditionally seen as a high-risk business because of its vulnerability to the weather, is actually a very healthy market to be in.


www.diyweek.net


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