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RANGE REVIEW: PET & WILDLIFE


NEW OPPORTUNITIES AS INDUSTRY DIVERSIFIES


AMA Research offers insight into the pet accessories market, with growth coming from products for small dogs, and opportunities in ‘pet technology products’, whilst retailers diversify to offer a wide range of products and services.


T but


he pet accessories market is generally considered to be relatively resilient to


economic slowdowns,


is a highly fragmented and competitive sector. It was worth an estimated £850million at retail selling prices in 2017, with steady underlying, but modest, growth currently forecast into the medium- term. Sectors covered include: care products, toys, housing, bedding & feeding, as well as collars, leads & utility products. The


overall market for pet


accessories has remained relatively static for a number of years, although there have been varying performances in different product sectors. The increasing trend for pet humanisation is adding value to the market, as pet owners are prepared to pay more for their pet accessories and may replace them more often. Products


for small


dogs represent a particular growth area, with rising demand for coats and grooming needs.


Key categories Care products are mainly seen as essential and help to underpin the market. These include flea and worm treatments that have benefited from a combination of wide distribution, increased awareness of the importance of preventative care and rising demand in recent years due to weather conditions that have boosted flea numbers.


Cat litter is a sector that has


become polarised between high value high quality products and high-volume, value-for-money products. The former helps to underpin sector size, with growth primarily driven by innovative products that focus on odour control, absorbency and the use of eco-friendly & biodegradable materials. Toys are a key product in the pet accessories market and this sector has been impacted by the


www.diyweek.net


Pet Superstores 40%


DIY Multiples 2%


Garden/Aquatic Centres 6%


Distribution in the pet accessories market


Independent Pet Stores 16%


Order/Catalogue/ Internet 14%


Grocery Multiples 12%


Mail


significant growth into the medium- term due to the highly price competitive nature of the market. Care and maintenance products are forecast to continue to underpin the market as they are generally considered to be essential, and also represent the largest product sector in the pet accessories market. Toys are forecast to remain a


Others 10%


key product sector, which is likely to benefit from continued product innovation and gift purchases. Rapidly-growing interest in interactive and multi-functional toys is expected to continue, including those that act as a plaything but also improve health. The trend for small aquariums


economic downturn, having shown only marginal growth since 2010. The aquariums and other vivarium sector has experienced low level growth, with the vivarium sector seeing particular growth in recent years, due to increased interest in reptiles as pets.


“Rapidly-growing interest in interactive and multi-functional toys is expected to continue, including those that act as a plaything but also improve health”


Imports are a key feature of some


product sectors, which has resulted in strong competitive pressures, for example in the toys sector, which has seen a difference in volume and value growth. However, the pet accessories market has also benefited from an increase in market size due to general price increases.


In terms of suppliers, the pet accessories market remains highly competitive and very fragmented, with even the largest players only having overall share of around 4-7%. However, within specific sectors, some organisations do have significant share – for example in the bedding & baskets and the cat litter sector.


particularly


Pet accessories is not a brand-led market,


with own brands popular for products like beds, collars, clothing, cat litter and aquarium pumps & filters, although there are some particularly strong brands in the flea treatment and aquarium product sectors.


Innovation in the market In terms of distribution, the pet superstore channel has continued to grow, with the number of outlets, choice and product range in these stores helping to stimulate demand and growth. In addition, the discount retail sector is also taking share, particularly for toys and some own-brand bedding and cat litter products. As a mature market, pet accessories is unlikely to show


has restricted sector growth, and the shift towards smaller houses is likely to continue to restrict higher levels of growth in the longer term. A sustained reptile market is forecast into the longer term. Pet ownership levels will also influence the market. Frequent changes


in ownership between


different types of pets, often seen in families with young children, will continue to benefit the market in the medium-to-long term, with pet humanisation and wellbeing prominent market features. A growth area appears to be in


pet ‘technology’ products, as seen in many consumer sectors as consumer interest in technology increases. The UK overall pet industry is diversifying, with some companies offering


a wide range of pet


products and services, including grooming, veterinary care, boarding and breeding and this is likely to be extended into the short- medium term.


The full ‘Pet Accessories Market Report – UK


2017-2021’,published by AMA Research is available now and can be ordered online at www. amaresearch.co.uk or by calling 01242 235724.


12 OCTOBER 2018 DIY WEEK 15


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