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Benchmark


2018 THE GARDEN MARKET SUPPLEMENT


SALES: INDEPENDENTS STILL DOMINATE THE MARKET


Total sales


1. Wyevale 2. Dobbies


3. Blue Diamond 4. Nottcuts 5. Klondyke Squires Hillier


6. 7.


8. Haskins 9. Scotsdale 10. Bents


11. Barton Grange 12. Frosts


13. Van Hage 14. Webbs


15. Woodcote Green 16. Garsons 17. Whitehall 18. Stewarts 19. Polhill 20. Gordale


Latest -1 -2 -3 year year year year -4 year


£325.4m £311.1m £290.4m £276.2m £259.2m £151.0m £153.7m £152.9m £142.0m £137.4m £96.5m £91.3m £82.8m £70.3m £62.5m £71.3m £67.8m £63.7m £55.9m £53.8m £54.5m £49.0m £48.1m £48.5m £47.0m £47.5m £44.8m £44.3m £41.8m £37.8m £33.0m £30.6m £28.4m £27.2m £25.4m £32.4m £31.5m £31.6m £29.4m £26.6m £22.2m £20.7m £20.3m £18.3m £14.9m £21.6m £20.0m £16.3m £15.2m £14.1m £21.2m £21.9m £22.5m £21.9m £21.6m £19.4m £19.0m £28.2m £31.1m £30.6m £18.4m £19.4m £19.1m £18.2m £17.2m £16.7m £16.2m £15.6m £14.7m £13.6m £16.2m £15.2m £13.7m £12.6m £10.8m £14.6m £13.0m £12.5m £12.5m £11.2m £13.1m £12.2m £10.8m £9.9m £11.6m £11.0m £10.5m £9.8m


£9.6m £9.3m


£10.8m £11.2m £10.7m £10.6m £10.6m £10.8m £10.9m £10.6m £9.6m


21. Chessington £10.6m £10.9m £10.6m £9.6m 22. Hayes 23. Aylett


24. Millbrook 25. Planters 26. Coolings Total


£8.5m £8.9m


£1,055.4m


£10.0m £9.3m £9.0m £8.0m £8.3m £7.2m £7.0m £7.0m £6.9m £6.5m £7.0m £6.8m £6.2m £5.7m £4.8m £6.1m £6.0m £6.9m £8.4m £8.3m £6.0m £5.7m £5.4m £6.2m £5.7m £1,016.2m


£978.4m


Source: DIY Week analysis of fi led company accounts 4 DIY WEEK GARDEN MARKET SUPPLEMENT


£920.4m O


ne of the enduring characteristics of the garden centre market is that unlike most other retail sectors, independent


£864.2m


operators still account for by far the largest part of the market. This chart tells the story: our top 26 garden centre operators achieved a combined sales total of more than £1.06bn in their latest accounting periods. But Wyevale, the market’s only national chain, accounted for only 31% of that fi gures. Second-placed Dobbies took 14% – so the two biggest operators jointly accounted for less than half the sales of the top 26. We have no way of knowing how much more business is generated by the remainder of the UK’s operators – who may between them run another 1,000 or so centres – but it’s clear that garden centre retailing remains very largely the preserve of the independent operator. Almost all the names in this list are privately- owned; many of them are still family businesses, even if they are achieving multi-million sales fi gures. The other key factor to emerge clearly from this table is that garden centres are achieving consistent, substantial growth. Our top 26 have grown their collective sales by nearly 22%, in the space of fi ve years. It’s instructive to compare that with the closely-related DIY market: in those same fi ve years, the top three national DIY chains (B&Q, Homebase and Wickes) have achieved combined growth of just 0.53%. Is it plant sales, and horticultural expertise? Coff ee shops? Impulse purchasing in clothing, toys, giftware and greetings cards? A combination of all the above, plus free parking? Garden centres are often described as ‘out-of-town department stores’ – but that doesn’t really do justice to their retail skills, given that high street department store retailing is something of a wasteland these days. Among bricks-and-mortar retailers, garden centres could well be the success story of the future.


www.diyweek.net


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